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TIMELINE

(1920s)

1920

Unknown              Maxwell resigns from bank and retires from banking business.  [The Daily Oklahoman, March 21, 1950]

February 4            Maxwell’s uncle, Pressley Maxwell, dies in Ardmore.  Perry, accompanying the body, leaves Ardmore for Marion, Kentucky where funeral services will be held.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 4, 1920]

April 28                  Maxwell retires as President of the Ardmore Chamber of Commerce and is named to the board and as a Vice President of the reorganized Chamber.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 28, 1920]

May 12                  Maxwell is in Oklahoma City for meeting of the State Bankers Association.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 12, 1920]

May 12                  Maxwell is the President of the Ardmore Chamber of Commerce.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 12, 1920]

May 12                  Maxwell serves on the inaugural court of honor for the Ardmore Boy Scouts to examine the qualification of Scouts for merit badges.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 16, 1920]

May 26                  Maxwell is named to the board of directors of the Chickasaw Refinery Company at the company’s annual stockholders meeting in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 27, 1920]

August 3                Maxwell departs Ardmore for Chicago.  “From there he will go to Detroit and will be in Toledo when the national golf tournament is held.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 3, 1920]

August 5                Maxwell is named to the Carter County Advisory Board and appointed as Secretary.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 5, 1920]

August 11-13        Maxwell attends 1920 U.S. Open at Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio with former Governor Cruce and Sherman Pyles of Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 3, 1920; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1920_U.S._Open_%28golf%29]

Aug. 14-Sept. 8    Following the U.S. Open in Toledo, “Mr. Maxwell will visit New York and the New England states One [sic] of his missions will be to select a school for his daughter after her completion of high school next spring.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 3, 1920]

September 9         Maxwell returns to Ardmore from an Eastern trip “spent in Ohio and New York principally.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 9, 1920]

October 6-7           Maxwell spends 2 days in Norman, Oklahoma laying out 9-hole sand green course for Norman Country Club. [The Norman Daily Transcript, October 12, 1920]

October 21            Chimes donated by Maxwell are installed in the First Presbyterian Church of Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 24, 1920]

 

November 8          Maxwell returns to Norman to make minor changes to Norman Country Club course layout.  [The Norman Daily Transcript, November 22, 1920]

 

November 10       Maxwell is planning a European trip “next summer”, possibly as part of an Ardmore delegation to the International Rotary club meeting in Edinburgh, Scotland in June of 1921.  [Daily Ardmoreite, November 10, 1920]  Editorial Note:  No evidence has been found to indicate that Maxwell actually made this trip.

 

December 31        Maxwell involved in plans to establish a “clearing house” for Ardmore banks.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 31, 1920]

 

1921

January 1              Construction of Norman Country Club course is expected to commence “at the first of the year” when renter moves off the property and complete possession is delivered to the club.  [The Norman Daily Transcript, November 22, 1920]

 

January 7              Ardmore Clearing House Association is formally organized with Maxwell elected as secretary-treasurer.  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 9, 1921]

 

January 16            Work on Norman Country Club course to resume as soon as the weather will permit.  [The Norman Daily Transcript, January 16, 1921]

 

February 11          Indian Nobel prize winning poet Dr. Rabindranath Tagore is Maxwell’s guest in Ardmore and provides lecture “on account of his friendship to Mr. Maxwell.”  Maxwell accompanies Dr. Tagore to Norman.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 11, 1921; Daily Ardmoreite, February 7, 1921]

 

March 11-14        Maxwell is among delegates of Ardmore Chamber of Commerce that visit Denison, Sherman, Whitesboro and Greenville, Texas to promote stock and automotive show in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 13, 1921]

 

March 13              Maxwell is a candidate for treasurer of the Ardmore School Board.  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 13, 1921]

 

March 17              Maxwell is elected treasurer of the Ardmore board of education.  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 17, 1921]

 

April 5                   Maxwell is the Democratic candidate for Ardmore School Board Treasurer.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 3, 1921]

 

April 6                    Maxwell departs Ardmore for Wichita, Kansas for the District Conference of the Rotarians.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 6, 1921]

 

May 12                  Norman Country Club course nearing completion.  [The Norman Daily Transcript, May 12, 1921]

 

May 20                  Maxwell is re-elected as President of Ardmore Chamber of Commerce.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 20, 1921]

 

May 27                  Maxwell is re-elected to the board of the Chickasaw Refining Company.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 27, 1921]

 

June 12-16            Maxwell competes in Oklahoma state amateur golf tournament in Oklahoma City.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 8, 1921]

 

June 15                  Charter issued for Duncan Country Club in Duncan, Oklahoma.  [Dallas Morning News, June 16, 1921]

 

Unknown              Maxwell designs Duncan Country Club in Duncan, Oklahoma.  [http://www.duncangolfandtennisclub.com/golf/]

 

June 17                  Maxwell visits friends in Davenport, New York.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 17, 1921]

 

June 27                  New 7th green at Dornick Hills is completed.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 27, 1921]

 

July 4                     New 7th green at Dornick Hills is played on for the first time.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 5, 1921]

 

July 7                     Maxwell loses in finals of Presidents Cup tournament at Dornick Hills, “which is regarded as the banner event of the year in local golf circles.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 7, 1921]

 

July 13                   Maxwell leaves Ardmore on train to Gainesville, Texas for baseball game between members of the Ardmore and Denton, Texas Rotary Clubs.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 13, 1921]

 

August 11              Maxwell advocates building a Chautauqua camp at the City lake site outside of Ardmore, Oklahoma, which he saw as “an opportunity to make Carter County the intellectual center of the state.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 11, 1921]

 

August 21              Reports of play at Norman Country Club, so the course was open for play at least by this date.  [The Norman Daily Transcript, August 21, 1921]

 

August 28              Maxwell is given a going away party by the Mayor of Ardmore before leaving for a trip to the east.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 28, 1921]

 

September 21       Some tees and greens are relocated at Norman Country Club.  [The Norman Daily Transcript, September 25, 1921]

 

September 24       Maxwell is in Burlington, Vermont on east coast tour by car with family and friends.  [Burlington Free Press, September 29, 1921]

 

September 25       Maxwell is in Bethel, Vermont “looking for a location for a summer residence.”  [Bethel Courier, September 29, 1921]

 

October 9              Maxwell returns to Ardmore from “a month’s trip to New York and other points in the east.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 10, 1921]

 

October 14            Maxwell is elected chairman of the Ardmore Salvation Army.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 14, 1921]

 

October 16            Maxwell is elected treasurer of the Ardmore Audubon Society.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 16, 1921]

 

October 16            Maxwell leads fundraising efforts for new Salvation Army building in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 23, 1921]

 

November 10       Maxwell, as president of the Ardmore Chamber of Commerce, is among a group of dignitaries and engineers inspecting proposed road between Ardmore and Davis, Oklahoma.  [The Daily Oklahoman, November 11, 1921]

 

November 12       Maxwell is among a group of concerned citizens who ask Governor Robertson to investigate the conduct of the Ardmore District Judge and Sheriff’s office.  The Governor responds by appointing a Special Judge and impaneling a Grand Jury to conduct the investigation.  [Daily Ardmoreite, November 15, 1921]

 

December 30        Maxwell is engaged to supervise landscaping of a new playground in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 30, 1921]

1922

January 18            Maxwell is on the committee that names a new Ardmore Sheriff to replace the prior Sheriff who was suspended and is being prosecuted for misconduct following the Governor’s investigation at the request of Maxwell and other concerned citizens.  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 19, 1922]

March                    Maxwell “made plans for the organization of” Rowanis Country Club in Gainesville, Texas and “assisted in its development”.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June  23, 1922]

 

March 27              Maxwell’s term as President of the Ardmore Chamber of Commerce ends.  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 27, 1922]

 

April 27                  Maxwell raises money for the construction of the Salvation Army building in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 27, 1922]

 

April 27-28            Maxwell is in McAlester, Oklahoma for a consistory session.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 1, 1922]

May 1                    Maxwell visits the proposed site of Pauls Valley Country Club (later named Hill Crest Country Club) in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma.  [Pauls Valley Democrat, May 4, 1922]

May 24-25            Maxwell is in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma to lay out Pauls Valley Country Club (later named Hill Crest Country Club) and prepares a fairway and four holes while there.  [Pauls Valley Democrat, May 25, 1922]

June 1                    Pauls Valley Country Club is officially named Hill Crest Country Club.  The nine-hole course is designed and constructed by Maxwell is complete and fairways have been mowed and greens constructed.  [Pauls Valley Democrat, June 1, 1922]

 

June 2                    Maxwell is in Norman for the organizational meeting to form the Oklahoma Chamber of Commerce and is elected to the executive committee.  [Tulsa Daily World, June 3, 1922]

 

June 6                    Maxwell is “spending a few days in Oklahoma City, after attending the State Chamber of Commerce which was recently formed in Norman.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 6, 1922]

June 21                  Maxwell attends the opening of Rowanis Country Club in Gainesville, Texas.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 23, 1922]

 

June 27                  Duncan Country Club opens with nine holes and sand greens. [The Oklahoman, April 2, 1957]

 

July 1                     Maxwell plays in tennis tournament in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 22, 1922]

 

July 4                     Maxwell attends opening ceremonies for Lincoln Park and speaks during the portion of the ceremonies relating to the new 9-hole golf course.  [Oklahoma Leader, July 3, 1922]  Editorial Note:  An April 16, 1922 article in the Daily Oklahoman states that Henry Hutchinson, a Tulsa landscape architect, "planned and built" the initial 9 holes at Lincoln Park and that Arthur Jackson, the club’s professional, would "help in building the remaining holes."  It is interesting to note, however, that only Maxwell is mentioned as attending and speaking at the opening ceremonies for the course.

 

July 19                   Maxwell stops in Duncan, Oklahoma on his way to Lawton with an Ardmore delegation hoping to be part of the Lee Highway.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 19, 1922]  Editorial Note:  Maxwell may have visited the recently opened Duncan Country Club during this stop.

 

July 20                   Maxwell is in Lawton, Oklahoma with Ardmore delegation for the Lee Highway.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 19, 1922]

 

July 24                   Maxwell is in Ardmore for meeting Chamber of Commerce meeting.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 26, 1922]

 

July 28                   Maxwell and Mort Woods win the Ardmore city doubles tennis championship.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 30, 1922]

September 8-10  Maxwell is in Oklahoma City.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 10, 1922]

 

October 10           Maxwell is named a director of the Oklahoma state Chamber of Commerce.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 11, 1922]

 

October 15            Maxwell is in Enid, Oklahoma to advise the Enid Country Club on changing its existing 9-hole sand green course to 18-hole grass green course.  Work is to begin “immediately under his planning.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 18, 1922]

 

December 21        Maxwell is appointed as sergeant of arms of the Ardmore Rotary Club.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 21, 1922]

 

1923

January 9              Maxwell is elected to the board of the First National Bank in Ardmore, Oklahoma.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 10, 1923]

 

February 20          Gene Sarazen and Jock Hutchinson play an exhibition match at Dornick Hills.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 20, 1923]

February 22          The recently formed Henryetta Country Club has secured 160 acres of land and "work of...laying out golf links...will begin at once.”  [Daily Oklahoman, February 23, 1923]  Editorial Note:  The September 9, 1923 Daily Oklahoman credits Maxwell with the Henryetta course.


March 29              Maxwell is in Henryetta, Oklahoma “on a short business trip.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 30, 1933]  Editorial Note:  The September 9, 1923 Daily Oklahoman credits Maxwell with designing the Henryetta course. 

May 10                  Maxwell is chairman of an Ardmore committee charged with raising funds for Tulsa University, which is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church of Oklahoma.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 10, 1923]

 

June 1                    “Plans are under way for the extension of the” Dornick Hills course to 18 holes as part of the club’s bid to land the 1924 Oklahoma state tournament.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 1, 1923]

 

June 3                    Maxwell departs Ardmore for Tulsa to compete in the Oklahoma state tournament and to participate in the Ardmore delegation attempting to bring the 1924 tournament to Dornick Hills.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 1, 1923]

 

June 4                    Maxwell loses “by default” in the second round of the Oklahoma state championship tournament in Tulsa.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 1, 1923; Daily Ardmoreite, June 17, 1923]

 

June 4                    Maxwell is elected President of the Oklahoma State Golfers Association at the association’s annual meeting in Tulsa.  Dornick Hills is awarded the 1924 Oklahoma state championship tournament provided the course is expanded to 18 holes.  “It is anticipated that as soon as Mr. Maxwell and his delegation return from Tulsa action will be pushed to improve the links and club house.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 5, 1923]

June 21                  The Henryetta Country Club Course “has been completed to the ninth hole.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 21, 1923]  Editorial Note:  The September 9, 1923 Daily Oklahoman credits Maxwell with the Henryetta course.

June 26                  Maxwell is appointed to lead the committee in charge of making “tentative arrangements for the construction of the new 18-hole course” at Dornick Hills in anticipation of the 1924 Oklahoma state championship tournament.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 27, 1923]

 

July 8                     Maxwell is in the process of adding a second 9-holes to Dornick Hills and converting greens to grass in advance of 1924 Oklahoma State championship tournaments.  Maxwell ”personally superintended all work done on the course.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, July 8, 1923]

 

July 8                     Maxwell is planning a trip to Scotland.  [The Daily Oklahoman, July 8, 1923]

 

August 25             Maxwell applies for a passport.  He is described as 5’8”, high forehead, gray eyes, sharp nose, medium mouth, round chin, black hair, olive complexion, thin face and “rather large outstanding ears.” [Passport application]

Early Fall               Maxwell spends 2-3 weeks looking at potential sites in Oklahoma City for Twin Hills Golf & Country Club. [The Oklahoman, April 20, 1924]

September 8         Maxwell, the "constructing contractor" of the Henryetta Country Club course, "has left for Edinburgh, Scotland...  In constructing the Henryetta links Mr, Maxwell was given a free hand to make the local links equal to any in the country, and it is with this intention that he goes to Scotland to study links and manners of the game as played by the originators of the sport."  [Daily Oklahoman, September 9, 1923]

September 23       Maxwell arrives in Liverpool with his sister and brother-in-law to tour courses in Scotland and England.  [Baltic passenger manifest]

 

Sept./Oct.              Maxwell studies the great golf courses of England and Scotland during his visit, including Westward Ho!, St. Andrews and Rye.  [Hutchinson News, December 21, 1936]  Editorial Note:  It is known that Maxwell visited Westward Ho!, St. Andrews and Rye, although it is not certain that he did so on his 1923 trip.  However, since no conclusive evidence has been found to date that Maxwell made subsequent trips to Scotland and England, we assume he studied these courses on this visit. 

 

Sept./Oct.              Maxwell meets Alister MacKenzie (most likely in St. Andrews, Scotland) and suggests that MacKenzie would find much in America.  Maxwell invites MacKenzie to visit him in the U.S.  [“The Life and Work of Dr. Alister MacKenzie”, by Tom Doak, James S. Scott and Raymund M. Haddock (2001), Pg. 102; "The Dr. Alister MacKenzie Chronology" by the Alister MacKenzie Society]

 

Sept./Oct.              Maxwell visits the his ancestral home of Anstruther, Scotland, south of Edinburgh.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 26]  Editorial Note:  Clouser’s information is based in part on interviews he conducted with now deceased descendants of Maxwell.  We accept their recollection of events in the absence of any information to the contrary.

 

October 20            Maxwell sails from Southampton, England for New York on the Mauretania.  [Mauretania passenger manifest]     

 

October 26            Maxwell arrives in the Port of New York.  [Mauretania passenger manifest]

 

November 4-5      Maxwell and his sister and brother-in-law are in Wyoming, Illinois following trip abroad.  [Wyoming (IL) Post Herald, November 7, 1923]

 

November 11       Maxwell and his sister and brother-in-law return to Ardmore from two months spent in Scotland and then Andover and Wellesley, Massachusetts visiting their daughters.  [Daily Ardmoreite, November 11, 1923]

December 25        New 9-holes at Dornick Hills are used for the first time.  “The splendid condition is attributed to the flock of sheep which C.P. Maxwell has kept on the property for a few years.”  All work on the new 9 is expected to be completed by the summer of 1924.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 28, 1923]

 

December 27        Maxwell is engaged to design and build Neosho Golf & Country Club course in Neosho, Missouri.  [Neosho Daily Democrat, December 28, 1923]

 

December 28        Maxwell spends the day looking over proposed grounds for Neosho Golf & Country Club.  [Neosho Daily Democrat, December 28, 1923]

 

1924

Unknown              Maxwell serves as president of the Oklahoma State Golf Association.  [The Daily Oklahoman, March 21, 1950]

 

Unknown              Maxwell completes the redesign of Muskogee Country Club with grass greens.  [Muskogee Country Club History; The Oklahoman, March 18, 1950]  Editorial Note:  According to the October 16, 1925 Paducah News-Democrat, Maxwell “recently” remodeled a course in Muskogee at a cost of $35,000. 

 

Unknown              Indian Hills Country Club in Tulsa opens 18 hole course designed by Maxwell with grass and sand greens.  [The American Annual Golf Guide 1926, Golf Guide Company, Inc. (1926); Daily Ardmoreite, June 4, 1929; The Daily Oklahoman, May 24, 1932]

 

January 5              Maxwell speaks at the annual meeting of the USGA greens section. [Bulletin of Green Section of USGA, Vol. IV, No. 2, February 23, 1924]

January 25            Maxwell “to begin immediately” laying out 9-hole public “Glenwood” golf course with sand greens in Ardmore, Oklahoma.  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 25, 1924]

 

March 7-8             Maxwell is in Neosho going over the proposed golf course and making final plans for the layout.  “The ground has all been cleared ready for the work of laying out the course.”  [Neosho Daily Democrat, March 8, 1924]

Spring                     Maxwell serves on USGA Green Section and is “selected as one of five men to represent the USGA in a tour of inspection of British courses and greens.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 20, 1924]  Editorial Note:  To date, no evidence has been found indicating Maxwell actually made this trip.

April 1                   Glenwood golf course opens to the public in Ardmore, Oklahoma.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 2, 1924]

April 16                  Maxwell is in Neosho inspecting course and reports that construction is progressing nicely with the intention of building temporary greens on holes 2, 5 and 6 so that they can be used for practice soon.”  [Neosho Daily Democrat, April 17, 1924]

                             

April 19                  Construction begins on Twin Hills in Oklahoma City. [The Oklahoman, April 20, 1924]                   

April 21                  Maxwell to return to Oklahoma City to take active charge of work at Twin Hills. [The Oklahoman, April 20, 1924]

April 24                  Maxwell is in Ardmore putting finishing touches on the second nine holes at Dornick Hills for 1924 Oklahoma State Amateur. [The Oklahoman, April 20, 1924]

                               

May 4                    Work is progressing rapidly at Twin Hills with five fairways cleared and planted and the remaining fairways expected to be ready for planting soon. [The Oklahoman, May 4, 1924]

May 4                    Maxwell is in Neosho looking over work on the course and attending a meeting of the club.  [Neosho Daily News, May 5, 1924]

May 7                    Maxwell departs Ardmore “on a short business trip to Oklahoma City.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 8, 1924]

May 22                  Maxwell is “transacting business today in Tulsa.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 22, 1924]  Editorial Note:  Based on the date, it is possible this trip related to the design and/or construction of Indian Hills Country Club in Tulsa.

May 27                  Maxwell departs Ardmore “on a short business trip to Oklahoma City.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 28, 1924]

May 28                  Maxwell is in Neosho, Missouri going over the course and shaping it up for play.  He directs that some fairways will be widened and trees cut and relocated over the next few weeks.  [Neosho Daily Democrat, May 29, 1924]

June 2                    Maxwell is in Neosho “shaping it up for the first year’s play.”  [Neosho Daily Democrat, June 2, 1954]

June 14-20            Dornick Hills hosts Oklahoma State Open and Oklahoma State Amateur tournaments on new 18 hole course with grass greens. [Tournament Program]

August 3                “Work on the Twin Hills golf and country club continues to progress with speed, nearly all of the fairways having been cleared and some of the bases for the greens have been filled in.” [The Daily Oklahoman, August 3, 1924]

August 7                Dean Woods moves his family to Oklahoma City where he “has been in business there for several months.” [Daily Ardmoreite, August 7, 1924]  Editorial Note:  Woods was presumably working on Twin Hills. 

October 17-18      Seven holes are complete and ready for play at Twin Hills open house.  “The work of clearing the fairways and grading the greens will go right along” with grass expected to be planted in the early spring of 1925 and the entire course promised by July 1, 1925. [The Daily Oklahoman, October 19, 1924]

October 26            Maxwell is in Neosho, Missouri looking over Neosho Golf & Country Club course with the idea of changing the greens.  [Neosho Daily Democrat, November 1, 1924]

November             Roughs cleared out and new bent grass greens built at Neosho Golf & Country Club.  New greens expected to be ready by early spring 1925.  [Neosho Daily Democrat, December 9, 1924]

 

December 18        Maxwell is in Ardmore while “the country club in Oklahoma City” that he is “doing some work for” is covered with snow and sleet. [Daily Ardmoreite, December 18, 1924]  Editorial Note:  The referenced Oklahoma City country club is presumably Twin Hills.

 
 
 
 

 

1925

Unknown              Maxwell designs Arkansas City Country Club in Arkansas City, Kansas, where he earns $500 for his first professional design fee.  [Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1951]  Prior to then, Maxwell worked “on a non-professional basis.”  [Shreveport Times, August 20, 1950]  Maxwell designs 18-hole golf course for the Arkansas City Country Club in Arkansas City, Kansas, but only 9 holes are actually built.   [“The Architects of Golf”, by Geoffrey S. Cornish and Ronald E. Whitten (1981), Pg. 341; “The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 90]

 

Unknown              Maxwell designs 18-hole sand green public Kennedy golf course in Tulsa on land owned by Dr. Samuel G. Kennedy adjacent to Tulsa Country Club.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 17, 1935; The Daily Oklahoman, November 21, 1952; The Daily Oklahoman, March 12, 1957; The American Annual Golf Guide 1926, Golf Guide Company, Inc. (1926)]

                               

January 12-19      Maxwell is in Springfield, Missouri “assisting…in the plans” for the Hickory Hills golf course.  [Springfield Leader, January 19, 1925]

 

January 14            Maxwell will construct the golf course for the Spavinaw mountain club on the south side of Spavinaw Lake (OK) northwest of Tulsa.  Maxwell has “just completed a survey of the location.”  Work on a road needed to bring materials to the site will start within two weeks.  [The Daily Oklahoman, January 15, 1925]

 

January 19            Maxwell addresses the Springfield Chamber of Commerce meeting in connection with Hickory Hills golf course project.  [Springfield Leader, January 19, 1925]

 

January 22            Maxwell declines to seek re-election after serving as president of Dornick Hills for 11 years since the club’s inception.  The club honors Maxwell for his service by naming him “president emeritus” for the remainder of his life.  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 25, 1925]

 

March 16              Maxwell leaves Ardmore “on a short business trip to Tulsa.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 17, 1925]  Editorial Note:  Based on the date, it is possible this trip related to the design and/or construction of the Kennedy golf course in Tulsa.

April 19                  Final work at Twin Hills “is progressing at an amazing speed”.  Fairways and greens have been completed and seeded.  “Practically all that needs to be done is conditioning of the fairways and greens.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 19, 1925]

April 27                  Work begins on the installation of an irrigation system and digging of a well at Twin Hills.  Work has started on sodding tees and greens and is expected to be completed “this week.” [The Daily Oklahoman, April 26, 1925]

May 6                    Hickory Hills course in Springfield, Missouri to eventually have 18 holes, with second 9 holes to be commenced after initial 9 holes is completed.  Maxwell is in “charge of laying out the Hickory Hills course.  He made two trips here and completed work on both of the nine-hole courses.”  [Springfield Leader, May 6, 1925]

May 22                  Work commences on 9-hole Wilson Golf Club course laid out by Maxwell in Wilson, Oklahoma on site selected by Maxwell.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 22, 1925]

 

May 31                  Initial 9 holes of Hickory Hills golf course in Springfield, Missouri opens.  [Springfield Leader, May 30, 1925]

 

June 11                  Wilson Golf Club changes its name to Hill Crest Country Club.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 11, 1925]

 

June 16                  Maxwell is in Tulsa to play in the Oklahoma state golf tournament.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 16, 1925]

 

July                         Maxwell is called into consult on existing course and tour potential sites for new golf course for Hillcrest Country Club in Bartlesville, Oklahoma.  A site 2½ miles south of town is identified as the best location for a new course.  [“Bartlesville Means Business – Hillcrest Country Club & Civic Culture”, by Gale Morgan Kane (2008), Pgs. 65 & 67]

August 22              Maxwell is in Neosho, Missouri making suggestions for improvements to Neosho Golf & Country Club, including relocation of 5th, 8th and 9th greens and 9th tee, the conversion of all greens to bent grass and adding a second 9 holes.  [Neosho Daily Democrat, August 27, 1925]  Editorial Note:  According to the March 17, 1974 Neosho News, grass greens were later abandoned due to cost of maintenance and replaced with sand greens.

 

August 24              Maxwell inspects proposed site for Lake View Country Club course in Paducah, Kentucky.  [Paducah Sun-Democrat, August 25, 1925]  Editorial Note:  Lake View is now known as Rolling Hills Country Club.

September 3         The greens at Twin Hills are “of a finer vein of Bermuda” than the fairways.  [The Daily Oklahoman, September 3, 1925]

September 7         The front nine holes at Twin Hills officially open for play.  “The second nine was not thrown open for use because of the tender condition of the greens.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, September 8, 1925]

 

September 25       Maxwell selected to design 9-hole course with sand greens for Perry Country Club in Perry, Oklahoma.  [Perry Journal, October 1, 1925]

October 1              Maxwell has completed the Kennedy golf course in Tulsa.  [Perry Journal, October 1, 1925]  Editorial Note:  While it is not clear exactly when the Kennedy course was completed, this article indicates that work was finished at least by the end of September of 1925.

 

October 1              Maxwell “is now reconstructing the course of the Enid Country Club.”  [Perry Journal, October 1, 1925]

 

October 3              Maxwell returns to Perry to commence work on Perry Country Club.  [Perry Journal, October 1, 1925]

 

October 15            Maxwell arrives in Paducah, Kentucky to design the Lake View Country Club course.  [Paducah News-Democrat, October 16, 1925]  Editorial Note:  Lake View is now known as Rolling Hills Country Club.

 

October 16            Maxwell begins laying out Lake View Country Club in Paducah. The course is expected to be completed by summer of 1926. [Paducah News-Democrat, October 16, 1925]  Editorial Note:  Lake View is now known as Rolling Hills Country Club.

October 20            After directing the opening of operations of the golf course” at Lake View Country Club in Paducah, Maxwell “will return to Oklahoma this afternoon.  Enroute to Ardmore, he will stop over in Oklahoma City, where he is building a $100,000 golf course.  He will return to Paducah later to look over the progress of the work on the local course during his absence.” [Paducah News-Democrat, October 20, 1925]    Editorial Note:  Lake View is now known as Rolling Hills Country Club.  The referenced Oklahoma City country club is presumably Twin Hills.

 

October 21            Construction has begun on Lake View Country Club in Paducah under the direction of Maxwell.  Work is progressing steadily and “in a few weeks the outline of the new course will be evident to visitors.” [Paducah News-Democrat, October 21, 1925]  Editorial Note:  Lake View is now known as Rolling Hills Country Club.

 

December 13        “A large force of workmen under Dean Woods, superintendent for Perry D. Maxwell, architect of the course, is now engaged in roughing the greens and clearing away such timber as interferes with the building” of the Lake View Country Club golf course.   “The first nine holes have already been finished and the workmen are starting on the second nine.” [Paducah News-Democrat, December 13, 1925]  Editorial Note:  Lake View is now known as Rolling Hills Country Club.

December 15        Twin Hills is described as “white elephant” on Maxwell’s hands as the owner of the course due to the failure to organize a golf club.  [The Daily Oklahoman, December 15, 1925]

 

December 20        Maxwell, “who is designing the course for the Lakeview country club, has returned to his home in Ardmore, Oklahoma.” [Paducah News-Democrat, December 20, 1925]

 

December 20        Maxwell inspects proposed site for Ada Country Club (later named Oak Hills Country Club) in Ada, Oklahoma.  [Ada Evening News, December 27, 1925]

 

December 28        Maxwell returns to Ada with construction foreman to lay out Oak Hills Country Club and prepare complete plans for construction.  [Ada Evening News, December 27, 1925]

 

1926

Unknown              Maxwell designs Hardscrabble Country Club course in Fort Smith, Arkansas.  [http://www.hardscrabblecc.com/Golf/Course-Information-14.html]

January 9              Work begins on Oak Hills Country Club in Ada, Oklahoma.  [The Oklahoman, January 10, 1926]

 

January 10            Work “progressing rapidly” on Oak Hills Country Club in Ada.  A survey of the land is completed with most of the 70.40 acre site being used for the golf course.  [Ada Evening News, January 10, 1926]

January 11            Maxwell looks over site for Hillcrest Country Club in Bartlesville, Oklahoma and is hired to design and build 18-hole sand green course over A.W. Tillinghast, Walter Travis and Tom Bendelow. [Bartlesville Enterprise, January 12, 1926; “Bartlesville Means Business – Hillcrest Country Club & Civic Culture”, by Gale Morgan Kane (2008), Pg. 72]

Late January        Dr. Alister Mackenzie is Maxwell’s guest in Ardmore, Oklahoma and tours Dornick Hills.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 43]  Editorial Note:  Clouser’s information is based in part on interviews he conducted with now deceased descendants of Maxwell.  We accept their recollection of events in the absence of any information to the contrary.

 

January 25            Dr. Alister MacKenzie is in Oklahoma City as the guest of Maxwell and visits Twin Hills.  MacKenzie “was favorably impressed with the Twin Hills course” and says it “would rank with those on Long Island which were built by Charles MacDonald.”  Mackenzie declares that Twin Hills is “Better than the three American courses I have been hearing about all my life, The Links, The Lido and Garden City.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, January 26, 1926; The Oklahoma News, January 26, 1926]  Editorial Note:  In the January 4, 1953 edition of the Daily Ardmoreite, Maxwell’s longtime friend Charles Evans describes being introduced by Maxwell to MacKenzie at the Biltmore Hotel in Oklahoma City, where MacKenzie said “Mr. Maxwell speaks of my ability to make a good fairway or develop a worthy green, but I wish to tell you that in laying out a golf course and to give it everything that the science and art of golf demand, Mr. Maxwell is not second to anyone I know.”  This meeting presumably occurred on the same visit as described in the referenced articles.

 

February 2            Construction starts on Hillcrest Country Club in Bartlesville under Maxwell’s direction.  [Bartlesville Morning Examiner, February 3, 1926]

 

February 11          Tree clearing for fairways underway at Hillcrest Country Club with a portion of the course expected to be ready for play by fall.  [Bartlesville Morning Examiner, February 11, 1926]

 

February 16          Maxwell is in Ada, Oklahoma reviewing work at Oak Hills Country Club.  [Ada Evening News, February 16, 1926]

February 24          Maxwell appears at a Tulsa city commission meeting with respect to proposed golf course at Mohawk Park.  [The Daily Oklahoman, February 28, 1926]

 

February 27          Maxwell meets with the committee in charge of financing the proposed 18-hole municipal golf course at Mohawk Park in Tulsa.  The committee “went over the proposed course” with Maxwell and plans to proceed as soon as 600 members commit to pay $15 each to finance construction with the goal of having the course “ready for use before this season is over.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, February 28, 1926]  Editorial Note:  Maxwell is often credited with only a green redesign of the Mohawk Park course in 1932 or 1934.  However, this article seems to show that he designed the original golf course.  The 1930’s redesign was most likely done my Floyd Farley.

 

April 1                    Construction starts on second 9 holes at Hickory Hills golf course in Springfield, Missouri.  [Springfield Leader, April 1, 1926]

 

April 1                    Oak Hills Country Club is in Ada is expected to be ready for play.  [Ada Evening News, January 10, 1926]

April 11                  Maxwell has completed sale of Twin Hills Country Club in Oklahoma City to Keefe Carter for just under $100,000.00.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 11, 1926]

 

May                       Nine holes open for play at Hardscrabble Country Club in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  [Joplin Globe, May 5, 1927]

 

August 5                Maxwell, accompanied by his mother, leaves Ardmore for Battle Creek, Michigan where she is undergoing treatment.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 5, 1936]

 

August 12              Maxwell expected to return to Ardmore with his mother from Battle Creek, Michigan where she “has been receiving treatment.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 12, 1926]

 

August 23              Maxwell returns to Ardmore from a visit of some weeks to points in Wisconsin” where his mother “remained for some time.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 23, 1926]

 

September 1         Lake View Country Club in Paducah, Kentucky officially opens.  Maxwell designed the course and Dean Woods was in charge of construction.  [“History of Paducah Parks, Playgrounds and Recreation”, compiled by Sue Dana Green, edited and printed by Gracie Alexander, August 1, 1978; The Daily Oklahoman, June 10, 1928]  Editorial Note:  According to the March 8, 1927 Paducah News-Democrat, the course was expected to be ready for play by early summer of 1927. It is possible that the reference in the “History of Paducah Parks, Playgrounds and Recreation” was to the opening of the club and not the course.  Lake View is now known as Rolling Hills Country Club.

September 14       Greens Committee at Hillcrest Country Club in Bartlesville to decide when to open the course for play.  [Bartlesville Morning Examiner, September 14, 1926]

 

September 19       Reports of tournament play at Perry Country Club in Perry, Oklahoma, so course open for play at least by this date.  The original nine hole course had sand greens with the 1st green reportedly in the shape of the state of Oklahoma.  [Perry Journal, September 20, 1926; The Daily Oklahoman, April 22, 1957]

 

October 8              Maxwell returns to Ardmore following “an extended automobile tour of the east” with his sister and Dean Woods.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 10, 1926]

 

October 10            Hillcrest Country Club in Bartlesville scheduled to open.  [Bartlesville Morning Examiner, September 26, 1926]  Editorial Note:  The opening was delayed until the spring of 1927 due to flooding.

 

December 25        Maxwell spends the Christmas holidays with his daughters Elizabeth and Mary Belle in New York City.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 25, 1936]

                                               

1927

Unknown              Mohawk Park golf course in Tulsa, Oklahoma, designed by Maxwell, opens with 18 holes and grass greens.  [The Daily Oklahoman, November 21, 1952; The American Annual Golf Guide 1930-1931, Golf Guide Company, Inc. (1931)]

 

Unknown              Lakeside Golf and Beach Club course, designed by Maxwell, opens in Tulsa with sand greens.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 17, 1935; The American Annual Golf Guide 1930-1931, Golf Guide Company, Inc. (1931)]

 

Unknown              Maxwell designs and builds second nine holes with sand greens to existing Cushing Country Club course. [The Oklahoman, March 26, 1957]

Winter                    Maxwell draws plans for Melrose Country Club in Cheltenham, Pennsylvania.  [Evening Bulletin, March 22, 1927]

 

January 1              “Work on the Melrose club links at Philadelphia was started about the first of the present year, and it is expected at least three years will be required to complete the building of the links and the improvements on the club property, the cost of which it is estimated will reach at least million dollars.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 12, 1927]

 

January 9              Maxwell returns to Ardmore from New York, “where he spent the holidays with his daughters, Elizabeth and Mary Bell.  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 9, 1927]

 

February 13          Maxwell inspects site for Fayetteville Country Club and is employed as the “general overseer” of work at the course in place of J.F. Francis, who resigned.  Maxwell only has a verbal agreement, but is expected to sign a definite contract when he returns the following week with an assistant and resume work.  The first nine holes have already been laid out with fairways cleared and are expected to be completed by July or August.  [Fayetteville Daily Democrat, February 14, 1927]

 

February 23          Maxwell arrives in Fayetteville, Arkansas from Ardmore to take charge of construction of Fayetteville Country Club.  Work to resume immediately.  [Fayetteville Daily Democrat, February 23, 1927]

 

March 6                 Maxwell “is in Philadelphia in the interest of business.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 6, 1927]  Editorial Note:  This is presumably in connection with work at Melrose.


March 8                 Maxwell stops in Paducah on his way to Philadelphia to inspect his design at Lake View Country Club in Paducah.  Maxwell is “well pleased with the condition of the course, which will be ready for play by the early part of the summer.” [Paducah News-Democrat, March 8, 1927]    Editorial Note:  Lake View is now known as Rolling Hills Country Club.  This article also notes that Maxwell is headed to Philadelphia “where he has a contract to build a golf course on a very ambitious course.” We assume that course is Melrose.

March 22              Mackenzie retained to make suggestions to Maxwell’s plans for Melrose Country Club.  Fairways cleared.  [Evening Bulletin, March 22, 1927]

 

March 22              Maxwell and Mackenzie to spend several days going over the property at Melrose before deciding on a final plan, with construction by Dean Woods under the supervision of Maxwell to begin at once.  [Public Ledger, March 22, 1927]

 

March 23              Maxwell and Mackenzie in New York to meet with P.C. Pulver of the New York Sun.  [New York Sun, March 24, 1927]

 

March 24              Maxwell and Mackenzie visit courses in New Jersey before Mackenzie’s scheduled departure the next day.  [New York Sun, March 24, 1927]

 

March 24              Maxwell, “who really designed” the Melrose Country Club course, “is going to give the construction work his special attention from now on.”  [New York Sun, March 24, 1927]

March 26              Work is started to cleanup a 70-acre tract adjoining Bob Noble Park in Paducah, Kentucky in advance Maxwell’s arrival to lay out golf course for free.  [Paducah News-Democrat, March 25, 1927]

 

March 30              Cleanup work on the site adjoining Bob Noble Park in Paducah, Kentucky has been going on for several days.  Maxwell is expected the following week to design a nine-hole golf course.  [Paducah News-Democrat, March 31, 1927]

Spring                     Hillcrest Country Club in Bartlesville, Oklahoma officially opens with 18 holes and grass greens.  Editorial Note:  This information was taken from a history page on the club’s website.  Unfortunately, that page has been removed and is no longer available.  We are nevertheless including this information in the absence of any evidence to the contrary.

April 7                    Maxwell arrives in Fayetteville, Arkansas from Philadelphia, “where he has been in charge of construction of a course.”  [Fayetteville Daily Democrat, April 7, 1927]  Editorial Note:  We assume the Philadelphia course is Melrose.

 

April 7                   Work on Fayetteville Country Club under the direction of Maxwell is nearing completion.  “All rough work on the course has been completed. Springing (sic) of Bermuda grass on greens and fairways will be underway within a few days.  [Fayetteville Daily Democrat, April 7, 1927]

April 23                  Plans for construction of a clubhouse at Twin Hills will necessitate moving the 9th green.  It is not clear whether Maxwell supervised this work.  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 23, 1927]


May 4                    Second nine holes “just completed” at Hardscrabble Country Club in Ft. Smith, Arkansas and will be thrown open for play at a tournament “next week.”  [Joplin Globe, May 5, 1927]

 

July 3                     Second 9 holes opens at Hickory Hills golf course in Springfield, Missouri.  [Springfield Leader, July 3, 1927]

 

July 4                     The new Jeffersonville Country Club clubhouse and golf course in Prather, Indiana, “will be thrown open for inspection on July 4th.”  [Courier-Journal, July 3, 1927]  Editorial Note:  Subsequent reports credit Maxwell with the Jeffersonville course. The course does not appear to have been finished at this point since the informal and formal opening did not occur for another year.  Rather, it seems this was just part of a membership drive.

 

July 9-10               Maxwell spends weekend with his family in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 12, 1927]

 

July 11                   Maxwell departs Ardmore for Philadelphia to continue work on Melrose Country Club.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 12, 1927]

 

July 16                   Paducah, Kentucky park board considers proposal for a municipal golf course to be designed by Maxwell “as a compliment to the city and his many friends here.”  If the project is undertaken, work would begin in the fall of 1927 with a projected opening in the summer of 1928. [Paducah News-Democrat, July 16, 1927]  Editorial Note:  This project would become Noble Hills municipal golf course which, according “History of Paducah Parks, Playgrounds and Recreation”, compiled by Sue Dana Green, edited and printed by Gracie Alexander, August 1, 1978, survived until the 1940s.

 

July 17                   9-holes course in Wilson, Oklahoma “just completed.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 17, 1927]

 

August 5                Maxwell departs Ardmore for vacation in Colorado Springs.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 5, 1927]

 

August 21              Maxwell is met in Philadelphia by his daughter, Elizabeth.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 21, 1927]

 

September 28       Maxwell in Ardmore “spending a few days with his family” in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 28, 1927]

 

September 28       Maxwell is “engaged in building two very pretentious golf courses, one in Philadelphia, Pa., the other at Louisville, Ky.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 28, 1927]  Editorial Note:  The Philadelphia course is almost certainly Melrose and the Louisville course is likely Jeffersonville Country Club in Prather, Indiana, a few miles northeast of Louisville.

 

December              Maxwell consulting with G.A. Nichols regarding Nichols Hills project in Oklahoma City.  [The Daily Oklahoman, June 10, 1928]

 

1928

                               

Unknown              Maxwell drafts plans for 18 hole championship course for the Fayetteville Country Club in Fayetteville, Arkansas.  However, the initial construction includes only ten holes, a 9-hole course plus a warm-up hole.  [“A History of the Fayetteville Country Club”, by Hugh Brewer with thanks to Allan Gilbert, Jr. (Revised 2007)]

                               

Unknown              Maxwell is listed as a member of Pine Valley on the club’s membership roster.  [“Pine Valley Golf Club: A Unique Haven of the Game”, by James W. Finegan (2000), Pg. 46]

 

Unknown              Maxwell designs nine holes in Ponca City, Oklahoma for E. W. Marland of the Marland Oil Company which would later become part of Ponca City Country Club.  [Ponca City Country Club, The 60th Anniversary, 1945-2005, by Frank Rogers (2005)]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell also designed the second nine holes at Ponca City Country Club.

 

January 10            Maxwell departs for New York to meet his “partner” (presumably MacKenzie) “and make plans for golf courses to be designed during the year.  They are to attend the national golf course designers’ association in New York City.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 10, 1928]  Editorial Note:  According to the January 20, 1928 San Francisco Examiner, Robert Hunter “returned a few days ago from a six weeks’ stay in the east, where he and Dr. MacKenzie…conferred on future plans and visited famous eastern layouts.”  This begs the question of whether MacKenzie, Hunter and Maxwell met together at this time.

 

February 12          Maxwell in Ardmore to serve as pallbearer at funeral.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 12, 1928]

 

February 18          Dr. Alister MacKenzie writes a letter to Maxwell praising his work at Melrose.  “When I originally asked you to come into partnership with me, I did so because I thought your work more closely harmonized with nature than any other American Golf Course Architect.  The design and construction of the Melrose Golf Course has confirmed my previous impression.  I feel that I cannot leave America without expressing my admiration for the excellence of your work and the extremely low cost compared with the results obtained.  As I stated to you verbally, the work is so good that you may not get the credit you deserve.  Few if any golfers will realize that Melrose has been constructed by the hand of man and not by nature.  This is the greatest tribute that can be paid to the work of a Golf Course Architect.”  [“The Life and Work of Dr. Alister MacKenzie”, by Tom Doak, James S. Scott and Raymund M. Haddock (2001), Pg. 128]

 

February 28          Maxwell returns to Ardmore from a business trip to California where he joined Mackenzie “at Pebble Beach and together they inspected some of the well known courses in that vicinity.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 28, 1928]

 

March                    Maxwell is constructing a nine-hole public golf course on 70 acres leased by the city of Paducah, Kentucky adjoining Noble Park. [Golf Illustrated, March 1928]  Editorial Note:  This project would become Noble Hills municipal golf course which, according “History of Paducah Parks, Playgrounds and Recreation”, compiled by Sue Dana Green, edited and printed by Gracie Alexander, August 1, 1978, survived until the 1940s.

March 17              A meeting is held of persons interested in developing a municipal golf course and other recreational facilities adjoining Bob Noble Park in Paducah, Kentucky.  Maxwell is expected in Paducah on April 1 to lay out the course, which he will design for free as an expression of appreciation for the people off Paducah.  [Paducah News-Democrat, March 17, 1927]

March 24              Maxwell is in Altus, Oklahoma “aiding in the selection of grounds” for the Altus Country Club and Golf Course.  A 160 acre tract 10 miles from Altus to be purchased “this week” with plans “under way” for the construction of a golf course and club house.  [Wichita Daily Times, March 25, 1928, Pg. 13]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell’s course was actually built as subsequent reports indicate construction of a course in a different location.

March 26              Work is started to cleanup a 70-acre tract adjoining Bob Noble Park in Paducah, Kentucky in advance of Maxwell’s arrival to lay out golf course for free.  [Paducah News-Democrat, March 25, 1928]

March 28              Construction of Melrose largely completed except for sand in traps.  [Unknown Newspaper, March 28, 1928]  Editorial Note:  According to the March 20, 1928 Paducah News-Democrat, Maxwell “received the highest fee ever paid a golf architect in this country” for designing a course in Philadelphia last year.  We assume that course is Melrose.   

March 30               Cleanup work on the site adjoining Bob Noble Park in Paducah, Kentucky has been going on for several days.  Maxwell is expected the following week to design a nine-hole golf course.  [Paducah News-Democrat, March 31, 1928]

April 1                    Maxwell declares support for establishment of a municipal golf in Ardmore, Oklahoma and agrees to build nine-hole course “without cost”.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 1, 1928]

 

April 28                  Maxwell visits tract of land across highway from Dornick Hills for proposed nine-hole sand green municipal course in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 29, 1928]

 

May 7                    Construction of Ardmore municipal golf course delayed while Maxwell is out of town.  Proposed site to be acquired “within the next few days”.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 7, 1928]

 

May 10                  Maxwell stakes off Ardmore municipal golf course.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 11, 1928]

 

May 12                  Construction starts on nine-hole sand green and tee Ardmore municipal golf course.  “Some grading must be done; several loads of loose rock…will have to be hauled away and the holes and tees constructed and sanded.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 11, 1928]

 

May 19                  Ardmore municipal course named “Hillsdale Golf Club”.  Construction delayed by rains.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 20, 1928]

 

May 27                  Maxwell is in Andover, New Hampshire to attend the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Phillips Exeter Academy.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 27, 1928]

 

June 2                    Hillsdale municipal golf course in Ardmore, Oklahoma officially opens.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 3, 1928]

June 8                    Elks Country Club course in Shawnee, Oklahoma “has already been laid out” on 160 acres by an unnamed "engineer."  [Adair County Democrat, June 8, 1928]  Editorial Note:  Multiple sources credit Maxwell with designing the Elks Country Club course in Shawnee, including The Daily Oklahoman, May 23, 1993, and “The Architects of Golf” by Geoffrey S. Cornish and Ronald E. Whitten (1981).  We assume the unnamed engineer was Maxwell in the absence of evidence to the contrary.

 

June 9                    Plans announced for MacKenzie and Maxwell to collaborate on two courses at Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City, one 18-holes and the other 9-holes.  Work expected to begin “within a short time”.  Maxwell “has been in Oklahoma City at intervals for the last six months, consulting… concerning the two courses.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, June 10, 1928]

 

June 10                  The informal opening of the 18-hole Jeffersonville Country Club course in Prather, Indiana, is held with the formal opening scheduled for July 4th, the one year anniversary of the club.  All of the regular greens and tees are in use.  Maxwell “laid out and designed” the golf course on 160 acres, with a 10 acre pond, bluegrass fairways and bent greens.  M.H. Veal, the former pro at Dornick Hills in Ardmore, has been hired as the pro.  [Courier-Journal, June 8, 1928]

 

June 20                  Maxwell leaves Ardmore accompanied by his sister and brother in law for Philadelphia and New York and are expected to be gone for 5 weeks.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 21, 1928]

 

Summer                 Construction commences on the Nichols Hills courses in Oklahoma City.  “A huge force of men, teams and tractors has been engaged in altering the landscape to conform to the requirements of the courses.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, May 5, 1929]

 

Summer                 Melrose Country Club opens for play.  [Evening Bulletin, March 27, 1929]

 

September 3         Maxwell leaves Ardmore to accompany his daughter, Mary Belle, by car to Andover, Massachusetts where she will enroll at Wellesley College.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 9, 1928]

 

October                  MacKenzie and Maxwell arrive by railroad in Grand Rapids, Michigan and drive to Crystal Lake with Walkley Ewing to discuss redesign of Crystal Downs existing 9-hole course.  MacKenzie delays departure for England “for a few days of intensive designing.  He and Perry Maxwell worked almost around the click until they had laid down holes and torn them up and laid them down again, emerging finally with the eighteen hole layout that we know today.”  [“Crystal Downs Country Club”, Frederick R. Baird (1981)]

 

November 17       Work on Nichols Hills courses continued under the supervision of Maxwell despite poor weather.  Maxwell expects the courses will be ready for play by late summer of 1929.  [The Daily Oklahoman, November 18, 1928]

 

December 2          Maxwell serves as a pallbearer at the funeral of W.I. Cruce in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 2, 1928]

 

December 22        Maxwell declares that Nichols Hills courses will be open “by late summer or early fall of 1929”.  Maxwell, “under whose supervision the two courses are being constructed” announces that MacKenzie, “who laid out the courses, is expected to reach Oklahoma City within a few weeks to assist in their completion.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, December 23, 1928]

                               

 
 
 
 
 

1929

Unknown              9-hole Shawnee Country Club designed by Maxwell opens in Shawnee, Oklahoma. [http://shawneecc.com/golf/the-golf-course]

January 4-5          Maxwell attends annual USGA meeting in New York City.  [The Daily Oklahoman, January 20, 1929]

 

January 20            Work “resumed last week on the two courses at Nichols Hills” following Maxwell’s return to Oklahoma City from New York.  Maxwell announces that “the courses will be ready for planting as soon as weather permits.”  Maxwell expects “an early visit” from MacKenzie. [The Daily Oklahoman, January 20, 1929]

Spring                     Maxwell returns to Michigan to supervise construction of Crystal Downs redesign.  “The new course would have been impossible in those years except for the continuing efforts of Perry Maxwell.”  [“Crystal Downs Country Club”, Frederick R. Baird (1981)]

 

Unknown              Maxwell rebuilds “the existing nine holes into today’s front nine” at Crystal Downs in Frankfort, Michigan.  [“The Life and Work of Dr. Alister MacKenzie”, by Tom Doak, James S. Scott and Raymund M. Haddock (2001), Pg. 131]

 

March 28              Maxwell will undertake the “remodeling of several of the greens of the Pine Valley golf course.”  Dean Woods “will supervise work on the course.”  [Paducah Sun-Democrat, March 28, 1929]

               

March 28              Maxwell and Dean Woods “hold a contract for the construction of a golf course at the University of Michigan.  Work will be begun this summer.”  [Paducah Sun-Democrat, March 28, 1929]

               

April                       Maxwell brings the original left 9th green at Pine Valley about 20' forward and builds bunkers behind it so that an overshot would not fall down the ledge into the 18th hole.  Maxwell also deepens and extends the bunker separating the old and new greens.  [“Pine Valley Golf Club: A Unique Haven of the Game”, by James W. Finegan (2000), Pg. 48]  Editorial Note:  According to Chris Clouser in “The Midwest Associate” (2006), Maxwell also changed the 8th green at approximately the same time as the 9th, although Clouser dates Maxwell’s work at Pine Valley to 1933-1935.

 

May 18                  Maxwell arrives in Ardmore for the 1929 Oklahoma state tournament at Dornick Hills.  He “has been in Ann Arbor, Mich., designing a course.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 19, 1929]

 

May 22                  Maxwell to depart Ardmore for Ann Arbor to lay out University of Michigan course.  [Ada Evening News, May 22, 1929]

 

May 26                  Maxwell leaves Ardmore for Ann Arbor, “where he is building a golf course for the University of Michigan.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 27, 1929]

 

June 16                  Sprinkling system for the fairways has been completed at Nichols Hills.  [The Daily Oklahoman, June 16, 1929]

 

June 23                  Fairways at Nichols Hills sodded and irrigated.  [The Daily Oklahoman, June 23, 1929]

 

July 12                   Dean Woods is in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 12, 1929]  Editorial Note:  Woods was presumably working on the University of Michigan course.

 

July 17                   Maxwell’s mother, Carrie Maxwell, dies in Ardmore at the age of 77 following a stroke.  Maxwell was at her bedside after being summoned from Ann Arbor, Michigan.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 17, 1929; Daily Ardmoreite, July 18, 1929]

 

July 18                   Maxwell accompanies his mother’s body back to Princeton, Kentucky for burial.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 18, 1929]

 

End of Summer   Front nine holes at new Crystal Downs course are completed and in play.  [“Crystal Downs Country Club”, Frederick R. Baird (1981)]

August                   Mackenzie and Maxwell arrive in Columbus to meet with Lynn St. John regarding Ohio State Golf Course.  [“My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course”, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

August 3               In a letter to Mr. L.W. St. John of Ohio State University, MacKenzie adds Maxwell’s name to the letterhead so that it reads “MacKenzie, Hunter & Maxwell.”  ["The Dr. Alister MacKenzie Chronology" by the Alister MacKenzie Society]

 

August 12              Maxwell returns to Ardmore from Ann Arbor, Michigan.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 12, 1929]

 

August 30              Maxwell is “on his way” from Michigan to Ardmore to be at the bedside of his son, Press, who underwent surgery.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 30, 1929]

 

August 31              Maxwell in Oklahoma City to inspect Nichols Hills courses “soon to be opened”.  [The Daily Oklahoman, September 1, 1929]

September 16       18-hole course Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City opens for play. [The Daily Oklahoman, September 8, 1929]

 

September 21-22 Oklahoma state amateur and professional championship tournament held on 18-hole course Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City less than a week after course opens for play.  The adjacent 9-hole course is not yet completed.  [The Daily Oklahoman, September 15, 1929]

 

Early Fall               Construction on University of Michigan course begins.  [The University of Michigan Golf Course, Wm. Slack, Jr., May 1945 Michigan Greenkeepers Report]

 

September 6         84 acre tract of land is acquired for a proposed 9-hole course for the Rochelle Town and Country Club in Rochelle, Illinois.  [Rockford (IL) Daily Register Gazette, September 6, 1929]

 

September 12       “Work on the University of Michigan golf course at Ann Arbor is going forward rapidly under the supervision of Perry Maxwell.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 12, 1929]

 

October                  Maxwell removes the hump in front of the 4th green and builds three bunkers to the right of 5th green at Pine Valley to counter the steep fall off into the woods.  [“Pine Valley Golf Club: A Unique Haven of the Game”, by James W. Finegan (2000), Pg. 50]   

 

October 5              Maxwell “employed to lay out 18-hole course for Rochelle Town and Country Club.  Work will be started at once.”  [Rockford (IL) Daily Register Gazette, October 5, 1929]

 

October 5-6           Walter Hagen and Horton Smith play an exhibition match at Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City.  [The Daily Oklahoman, September 1, 1929]

 

October 7              Mackenzie and Maxwell meet with the Athletic Board and Golf Committee to present vision for Ohio State Golf Course.  The Board approves motion to commission Mackenzie to layout the courses.  [My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

 

October 30            “Work had been progressing rapidly on the [Rochelle Town and Country Club] course despite inclement weather conditions.”  [Rockford (IL) Republic, October 30, 1929]

November             Mackenzie signs contract for Ohio State Golf Course.  [My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

 

December 16        Maxwell, already a Nonresident Member at Pine Valley, is made an Honorary Member “in view of the services and advice which have been rendered by Mr. Maxwell to the Club, and in recognition of his offer to respond at any time to any request of the Club for improvements or minor changes in the course without compensation.”  [“Pine Valley Golf Club: A Unique Haven of the Game”, by James W. Finegan (2000), Pg. 51]

December 16        Maxwell “is home from an extended eastern trip.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 16, 1929]

 

December 26        Maxwell is in New York City with his three daughters for the holidays.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 26, 1929]

CONTINUE TO 1930​