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TIMELINE

(1940s)

1940

Unknown              Maxwell is engaged to design an 18-hole course for Duke University, but the project is delayed by lack of funds and World War II and Maxwell’s course is never constructed.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pgs. 100 and 256; Durham Morning Herald, May 24, 1985]

Unknown              Maxwell makes suggestions for changes to Neosho Golf & Club in Neosho, Missouri.  [Neosho Daily Democrat, May 17, 1941]

 

Unknown              Maxwell’s redesign of the original nine holes at Topeka Country Club in Topeka, Kansas and the addition of a second nine holes is completed.  [https://www.topekacc.org/Club-Info.aspx]
 

January                 Maxwell has been selected to remodel the Hope Valley Country Club course in Durham, North Carolina.  [Greensboro Daily News, January 17, 1940]  Editorial Note:  According to the May 13, 1956 Greensboro Daily News, Maxwell remodeled 8 greens at Hope Valley Country Club in 1940.  In “Donald Ross and His Total Gem – A short history of his Hope Valley Country Club course” by John L. Moorhead (2000), Maxwell is reported to have remodeled bunkers and roughly 10 greens.  While Moorhead dates Maxwell’s changes to 1937-1938, the work appears to have been done in 1940.

January                 Maxwell “supervised the laying out of the Winston-Salem municipal course and the Reynolds course.”  [Greensboro Daily News, January 17, 1940]  Editorial Note:  The municipal course is presumably Reynolds Park and the Reynolds course is presumably Old Town.

January 9              Changes to Maidstone proposed by Maxwell which are expected to be implemented in time for the upcoming season include a dune along the 1st fairway “a bit to the right of the straight line to the green” which needs to be carried, and carry bunkering up the 2nd fairway.  In addition, “Chances are that out around those magnificent dunes that parallel the ocean there’ll be new holes created to replace those damaged in part by the 1938 hurricane. Though not an accomplished fact yet, there’ll probably be a new eighth all along the water…And a gradual slope cut into the ninth…  Maidstone hasn’t determined just how far it will go with the alterations planned last year by Perry Maxwell.  His ideas called for a brand new ninth green off in the hollow to the right of the present green, a new line of play for the tenth, a new 14th paralleling the water and a shortened 15th to make the shot more evident.  The change on the 15th will cut the course par a stroke - down to the usual 72.”  [Brooklyn Eagle, January 9, 1940]  Editorial Note: According to “The Maidstone Links”, by David Goddard (1997), only some of Maxwell’s suggestions were actually implemented.


January 16            Maxwell awarded contract to layout plans and supervise construction of nine-hole golf course on 76 acres adjoining Gillespie Park in Greensboro, North Carolina.  [Greensboro Daily News, January 17, 1940]

 

January 27            Maxwell submits tentative outline for the proposed Gillespie Park Golf Course in Greensboro, North Carolina.  [Greensboro Record, January 27, 1940]

 

February 1            Cost estimate for Gillespie Park Golf Course based on Maxwell’s proposed plan are submitted in connection with application for WPA funding.  [Greensboro Daily News, February 1, 1940]

 

February 7            Greensboro City Council approves plan for Gillespie Park Golf Course, subject to WPA aid.  Maxwell submitted blueprint of proposed 9-hole course “along with another map showing how the city could convert the course into an 18-hole affair should the nine-hole course prove profitable.”  [Greensboro Record, February 7, 1940]

 

April 12                  WPA approves funding for Gillespie Park Golf Course.  [Greensboro Record, April 12, 1940]

 

May                       Maxwell is in “charge of remodeling the course of the Maidstone Club at East Hampton, L.I.”  [“Charming – is the word for Winston”, by R.E. Lauterbach, GOLF magazine, circa May/June 1940]

 

May 9                    Colonial Golf Club in Fort Worth is awarded the 1941 U.S. Open.  [Amarillo Daily News, May 10, 1940]

 

June 1                    Reynolds Park course in Winston-Salem, North Carolina officially opens.  [Greensboro Daily News, June 1, 1940]

 

June 14                 Maxwell and his daughter Mary Belle have been “in town” for several days.  [Rutland (VT) Daily Herald, June 14, 1940]  Editorial Note:  Rutland is roughly 30 miles from Manchester, Vermont, which raises the possibility that Maxwell’s visit may have related to his work at Ekwanok in advance of the national intercollegiate golf tournament being held there that month.

June 22                  Maxwell arrives in Greensboro to begin laying out Gillespie Park Golf Course.  [Greensboro Daily News, June 25, 1940]

 

June 24                 Work on the West Course at Maidstone have been completed with some “minor” work still “to be done on the ninth fairway subject to Perry Maxwell’s approval.”  [“The Maidstone Links”, by David Goddard (1997), Pgs. 106-108]  Editorial Note:  Goddard relies on club minutes from June 24, 1940.

 

June 25                  Work begins on Gillespie Park Golf Course.  [Greensboro Record, June 25, 1940]

 

June 25                  Maxwell leaves Greensboro but will return in about 10 days.  [Greensboro Record, June 26, 1940]

June 27                  Maxwell is “remodeling” Augusta National to lengthen the 15th hole and make other minor changes.  [Greensboro Record, June 27, 1940]

June 27                  National intercollegiate golf championship is held at Ekwanok “this week” on course “remodeled” by Maxwell.  [Greensboro Record, June 27, 1940]

 

June 27                  Maxwell and Dean Woods “have settled down in Fort Worth to spent [sic] the next year readying the Colonial Golf Club for the 1941 National Open.  No radical changes are planned, but the entire 18 holes will be retrapped to make one of the South’s toughest courses a wee bit harder for the field.”  [Paris (TX) News, June 27, 1940]

 

July 3                     Maxwell says construction on Gillespie Park Golf Course suspended for a week by WPA.  [Greensboro Record, July 3, 1940]

 

July 7                     Dean Woods is in Fort Worth, Texas, where he will be working on the Colonial Country Club course for “several months.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 7, 1940]

 

July 14                   Perry and Press Maxwell are in Clearwater, Florida where they “are engaged in remodeling a golf course.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 14, 1940]  Editorial Note:  The referenced course is presumably Clearwater Country Club.

 

August 4                Perry Maxwell “has completed the remodeling and ‘streamlining’ of seven greens at the Clearwater Country Club course.”  [Tampa Tribune, August 5, 1940]

 

August 7                Colonial Country Club “is undergoing an extensive and expensive face-lifting process.  New greens are being constructed and many sand traps installed for the national golf event next year.”  [Paris (TX) News, June 27, 1940]

November 16       Maxwell “stretching” Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth to well over 7,000 yards in advance of 1941 U.S. Open.  [Globe-Gazette (Mason City, IA), November 16, 1940]

 

November 24       Maxwell in Greensboro supervising construction of Gillespie Park Golf Course.  [Greensboro Record, November 25, 1940]

 

December 13        Construction of Gillespie Park Golf Course completed except for seeding, which will occur when Maxwell returns in March or April of 1941.  [Greensboro Record, December 12, 1940]

 

December 29        Perry and Press Maxwell are home in Ardmore for the holidays “from North Carolina where they have been engaged in building a golf course”.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 29, 1940]  Editorial Note:  The referenced course is presumably Gillespie Park in Greensboro.

 

1941

January 3              Changes to Colonial Country Club “blueprinted” by Maxwell expected to be complete in “a few months”.  Maxwell “sprinkling traps liberally over the layout and several greens have been cut down to postage stamp size.  The third green has been pulled back some fifty-odd yards.”  Ground broken on new 4th and 5th holes.  “Many other greens have been pulled back and remodeled.” [Dallas Morning News, January 3, 1941]

 

March 16              Maxwell and Dean Woods have given every hole at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth “a thorough going-over,” including new holes 3-5.  [Montana Standard, March 16, 1941]

 

March 17              Perry and Press Maxwell are in Ardmore for a brief visit and are spending the day in Oklahoma City with Mary Belle Maxwell.  They will be “on their way to the east coast but will return soon to North Carolina and Long Island.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 17, 1941]

 

March 30              Dean Woods is remodeling Colonial Country Club course using Maxwell’s plans.  [The Daily Oklahoman, March 30, 1941]

March 30              Maxwell “has just changed” the Augusta National course in collaboration with Bobby Jones, “moving tees and greens on five of the holes.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, March 30, 1941]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear exactly which holes Maxwell modified.  However, the article implies that these were recent changes and not those from 1937-1939.

April                       Maxwell visits Corsicana Country Club in Corsicana, Texas at the club’s expense and “walked its length and breadth.”  Soon thereafter, the club “began tearing up the place.  Old holes began disappearing.  New holes, some of the finest in Texas, began shaping up.” [Dallas Morning News, May 4, 1941]  Editorial Note:  The exact extent of Maxwell’s involvement at Corsicana is not known.  However, it seems clear that, at the very least, he consulted with the club on changes made to their existing golf course. 

April 3-6                Maxwell attends the Masters tournament in Augusta, Georgia.  [The Daily Oklahoman, March 30, 1941]

 

April 4                    Maxwell “blueprinted some new hardships” at Colonial Country Club and sent Dean Woods “to put them into effect.”  [Dallas Morning News, April 4, 1941]

 

April 16                  Jeffersonville Country Club in Prather, Indiana, including the 18-hole course designed by Maxwell, is sold and will be converted into a corm farm.  [Courier-Journal, April 16, 1941]  Editorial Note:  This article notes that the club attracted business men in the “prosperous Twenties” but fell on hard times after the crash of 1929 and was ultimately abandoned.

May 17                  Maxwell describes his dream of building “the perfect course” in the undulating sand dunes of the New Jersey shore, which “would make for the finest topography in the world” for a golf course.  His plans included “an amphibious plane base so that wealthy New Yorkers could ferry down for a round of golf and return to the city within two or three hours.”   [Ogden Standard Examiner, May 18, 1941]

 

May 21                  Dean Woods has completed a year-long remodeling job at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, including the addition of 35 new bunkers.  The redesigned 5th hole is “ailing” due to heavy rains that have affected the growth of the new Bermuda grass fairway and there is only a 50/50 chance it will be ready for the U.S. Open.  If the new hole is not ready for play, the old hole, which was also remodeled, will be used.  [Dallas Morning News, May 25, 1941]

 

May 30                  Maxwell leaves Greensboro, where he was working on the Gillespie Park Golf Course, to attend the U.S. Open at Colonial.  [Greensboro Daily News, May 31, 1941]

 

June 5-7                 U.S. Open held at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas on course recently redesigned by Maxwell.  [Greensboro Daily News, May 31, 1941]

 

August 15              Odessa Country Club announces plan to expand existing 9-hole course to 18-holes with grass greens.  The new 9-holes will be constructed “without any interference with the playing on the first nine holes.”  [The Odessa (TX) American, August 15, 1941]

 

August 18              Odessa Country Club has “blue prints on hand for the newly projected changes” to add 9-holes to the existing course.  [The Odessa (TX) American, August 18, 1941]

 

August 25              Maxwell and Dean Woods are engaged to design and build an additional 9 holes at Odessa Country Club in Odessa, Texas to bring the course to 18-holes.  Work started on the 10th green “today” with Woods overseeing construction. [The Odessa (TX) American, August 25, 1941]  Editorial Note:  This article also credits Maxwell with “three new courses just completed on Long Island, New York.”

 

August 27              Maxwell is in Ponca City, Oklahoma “where he is working on a golf course.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 27, 1941]  Editorial Note:  The course in question is presumably Ponca City Country Club.  However, the exact nature of Maxwell’s work is not known.  Most likely, he was involved with the conversion of sand greens to bent grass, although it is possible he redesigned the course, including the abandoned back nine holes.

August 29              Maxwell is in Ardmore visiting family.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 29, 1941]

September 9         “The second nine holes on the Odessa Country Club layout are rapidly taking shape as the dirt workmen had completed the roughing in work on the first seven” new holes.  [The Odessa (TX) American, September 9, 1941]

 

September 13       All nine of the new holes at Odessa Country Club are expected to be “laid out and the base soil laid by the end of this week.”  [The Odessa (TX) American, September 9, 1941]

November 1          Gillespie Park Golf Course officially opens.  [Greensboro Daily News, October 25, 1941]

 

1942

 

January 18            The new 9-holes added at Odessa Country Club added by Maxwell and Dean Woods are ready for member play.  The new holes “are built around the first nine, in a semi-circle facing east and north.”  The greens are all in play, but the tees “are temporary and the approaches have not yet been completed but are in playable shape.”  [The Odessa (TX) American, January 15, 1942]

 

February 27          Maxwell returns to Atlanta, Georgia, where he is building a golf course, after a brief visit to his home in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 27, 1942]  Editorial Note:  The course in question is presumably the North Fulton Park golf course.

 

May 6                    Payment to Maxwell of $1,000 for his work on North Fulton Park golf course in Atlanta is approved by county commissioners.  [Atlanta Constitution, May 7, 1942]

 

June 30                  Press Maxwell enlists in the army and is “stationed in Fort Bragg, N.C., where he is working in the induction center.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 30, 1942]

 

July 27                   A proposal to pay Maxwell $500 “for designing a number of holes at the Adams park golf course” in Atlanta was held up by county commissioner objection.  [Atlanta Constitution, July 17, 1942]

 

1943

 

Unknown              The greens on the Perry Golf & Country Club course in Perry, Oklahoma are converted from sand to Bermuda grass.  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 22, 1957]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell was involved in the conversion.

 

March 18              Press Maxwell “has begun training as an aviation cadet at Maxwell Field in Montgomery, Ala.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 18, 1943]

 

June 11                  Maxwell spends several days in Ardmore “following his return from Atlanta, Ga., where he has been engaged for the past year and a half in remodeling two of the finest golf courses there, owned by Fulton county.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 11, 1943]  Editorial Note:  The courses in question are presumably North Fulton County and Adams Park golf courses.

 

November 1-7      Maxwell visits Austin, Texas and “gave the thumbs up sign to a tract south of the Colorado Rover and outside of Austin’s southeast city limit” in the event Austin Country Club elects to move locations.  [“One Hundred Years of Champions and Change – The History of Austin Country Club”, Frances G. Trimble (1999), Pg. 113]  Editorial Note:  The site referenced above appears to be the final site chosen for the new Austin Country Club course.  However, subsequent newspaper articles indicate that a site for the new Austin Country Club course was not definitively decided until 1946 or 1947.  It is not clear whether the date given in the club history is incorrect or whether the Colorado River site chosen was one of the earlier sites considered by the club.

 

1944

Unknown              Maxwell commissioned to begin laying out Lakewood Golf Club in Point Clear, Alabama.  [http://www.lakewoodatthegrand.com/history.asp]

 

January 4              Dora Maxwell is married in Baltimore, Maryland.  [The Daily Oklahoman, January 16, 1944]  Editorial Note:  Maxwell presumably attends the wedding, although the newspaper account does not specifically say so.

 

Summer                 Maxwell has leg amputated in Philadelphia. [The Daily Oklahoman, February 11, 1945]

 

July 30                   Mary Belle Maxwell is married in Dallas, Texas.  The bride’s uncle, Morton C. Woods, gave her away.  Maxwell presumably is unable to attend the wedding due to his leg amputation.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 31, 1944] 

September             Maxwell spends almost a month in a Philadelphia hospital following amputation.  Upon leaving hospital, Maxwell goes it Bethlehem and meets with Eugene Grace on “Saturday” and starting work on the Saucon Valley course on “Monday”.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 29, 1944]

 

Fall/Winter            Maxwell rebuilds 14 greens at Saucon Valley that results in two holes (11 and 12) being redesigned. [The Daily Oklahoman, March 21, 1950]

 

1945

Unknown              Maxwell completes the redesign of four holes at Salina Country Club in Salina, Kansas.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 256]  Editorial Note:  Clouser’s information is based in part on interviews he conducted with the club.  We accept the club’s historical record in the absence of any information to the contrary.

 

Unknown              The greens on the Perry Golf & Country Club course in Perry, Oklahoma are converted from Bermuda to bent grass.  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 22, 1957]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell was involved in the conversion.

 

February 5-10      Maxwell is in Oklahoma City looking after “business interests”.  [The Oklahoman, February 11, 1945]

 

February 6            Maxwell is elected to the board of Dornick Hills Country Club.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 7, 1945]

 

February 10          Maxwell departs Oklahoma City for Ardmore.  [The Oklahoman, February 11, 1945]

 

February 11          Maxwell “just completed remodeling” of Saucon Valley course, including the rebuilding of 10 greens.  [The Oklahoman, February 11, 1945]

 

June 9                    Maxwell is in Oklahoma City visiting friends.  [The Daily Oklahoman, June 10, 1945]

July                         Press Maxwell returns home to Ardmore after being decorated with the wings of the Yugoslav air force by Marshal Tito in a ceremony in Belgrade, Yugoslavia.  Press is credited with saving 5,000 American fliers downed in the Balkans after joining the 15th air force headquarters rescue unit in December of 1944.  Previously, Press had been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal following 81 combat missions in the European theater of operations.  [The Daily Oklahoman, August 5, 1945]

 

August 12              Press Maxwell is in Enid, Oklahoma at the army air field following a leave visiting family in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 12, 1945]

 

September 21-23 Maxwell is in Tulsa for Southwest invitational tournament at Southern Hills Country Club.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 21, 1945]

 

September 24       Maxwell will “hurry back to Mobile where he is building his 47th golf course” after the tournament at Southern Hills.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 21, 1945]  Editorial Note:  The Mobile course is presumably Lakewood Country Club in Point Clear, Alabama, outside of Mobile. 

 

October 22            Press Maxwell is married in Lawrence, Kansas.  It is not clear whether Perry attended the wedding.  [Daily Ardmoreite, November 1, 1945]

 

November 15       Maxwell is in Ardmore for a visit.  [Daily Ardmoreite, November 15, 1945]

 

November 30       Maxwell looks over 120-acre tract northeast of Springfield, Missouri and preliminarily lays out 18 hole, par 70 golf course.  [Joplin Globe, December 5, 1945]  Editorial Note:  The course is not named, but it is almost certainly the Grandview Municipal Golf Course.

 

December 13-15  Maxwell spends several days in Austin at invitation of Austin Country Club officials looking at proposed sits for a new golf course.  [Austin American, December 23, 1945]

 

1946

Unknown              Maxwell marries Josephine Hume in Princeton, New Jersey with Jessie Hume and Press and Hodie Maxwell in attendance.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 111]  Editorial Note:  Clouser’s information is based in part on interviews he conducted with now deceased descendants of Maxwell.  We accept their recollection of events in the absence of any information to the contrary.

 

Unknown              Maxwell is one of the founding members of the American Society of Golf Course Architects.  [https://asgca.org/architect/pmaxwell/]

Unknown              Maxwell engaged to design and build Oakwood Country Club in Enid, Oklahoma.  [Enid News and Eagle, March 25, 2012]

 

February 14          Per Austin Country Club officials, “We have been looking at a number of sites around Austin and have had Perry Maxwell of  Tulsa , one of the nation’s outstanding golf course architects down here to advise with us…We have several locations in prospect but haven’t picked a definitive site yet.”  [Austin American Statesman, February 14, 1946]

 

March 24              Maxwell’s grandson, Peter Burton Harrison, recently born to his daughter Dora in Princeton, New Jersey.  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 24, 1946]

                                               

1947

Unknown              Maxwell designs 9-hole Par 3 golf course at Excelsior Springs, Missouri.   [“The Architects of Golf”, by Geoffrey S. Cornish and Ronald E. Whitten (1981), Pg. 341; The Daily Oklahoman, May 23, 1993Editorial Note:  This course no longer exists.

 

January 11            Grandview Municipal Golf Course in Springfield, Missouri less than 70% complete.  [January 19, 1947 letter from F.C. McClure]

 

January 24            Maxwell makes proposal to the board of Austin Country Club.  The board elects “to postpone approval of a course construction contract.”  [“One Hundred Years of Champions and Change – The History of Austin Country Club”, Frances G. Trimble (1999), Pg. 115]

January 25            Maxwell and his new wife attend the wedding of his stepson, David Lindsay Hume, in Decatur, Alabama.  [Decatur Daily, January 26, 1947]

 

January 27            Maxwell and his wife have returned to their home in Tulsa following the wedding of his stepson, David Lindsay Hume, in Decatur, Alabama.  [Decatur Daily, January 26, 1947]

February 1            Possible meeting in Springfield, Missouri with respect to progress at Grandview Municipal Golf Course.  [January 19, 1947 letter from F.C. McClure]

 

February 18          Austin Country Club is in possession of a bid by Maxwell with respect to their proposed new golf course.  [Austin American-Statesman, March 6, 1947]

 

Early March         Maxwell returns to Austin “with additional propositions” for new Austin Country Club course and the board approves drawing up a contract with Maxwell.  [“One Hundred Years of Champions and Change – The History of Austin Country Club”, Frances G. Trimble (1999), Pg. 115]

 

March 6                 Austin Country Club officials announce that Maxwell will design the new golf course.  [Austin American-Statesman, March 6, 1947]

 

Spring                     Maxwell lays out 9-hole course at Lawton Golf & Country Club in Lawton, Oklahoma.  [Lawton Constitution, May 4, 1947]

 

April 5                    “Work is progressing at a rapid pace” on the Oakwood Country Club course in Enid, Oklahoma.   Maxwell “already has laid out the course” and Press “is on the job” supervising construction.  “The greens have been roughed in and the tees constructed.”  Bent grass will be planted on the greens and bermuda grass on the tees.  Water lines are being “laid now” and “work will begin soon in drilling water wells.  The course is expected to be ready for play in the early spring of 1948.  [The Oklahoman, April 6, 1947]

 

April 10                  Press Maxwell is in Austin and Perry Maxwell will arrive later in the week to break ground on construction of the new Austin Country Club course.  [Austin American-Statesman, April 10, 1947]

 

May                       Maxwell completes construction of 18 holes (Azalea and Dogwood nines) at Lakewood Golf Club in Point Clear, Alabama.   [http://www.lakewoodatthegrand.com/history.asp]            

 

June 7                    Lakewood Golf Club officially opens.  [http://www.lakewoodatthegrand.com/history.asp]           

 

July 10                   New Austin Country Club course is “now under construction under the direction of Perry Maxwell” and “is expected to be in playing conditions within 18 months.”  [Austin American, July 11, 1947]

 

August 4-8            Maxwell on site at construction of Austin Country Club course.  [Austin American, August 10, 1947]

 

August 11-15        USGA agronomist Dr. Fred Grau of USGA visits with builders of Austin Country Club course to advise whether greens should be bent or bermuda grass.  [Austin American, August 10, 1947]

 

Late Summer       Grandview Municipal expected to be completed.  [January 19, 1947 letter from F.C. McClure]

                               

1948

Unknown              Perry and Press Maxwell design an 18-hole golf course at F.E. Warren Air Force base in Cheyenne, Wyoming. [March 31, 1981 letter from Press Maxwell]  Editorial Note:  Based on aerial photos, a 9-hole course existed on July 13, 1947 and was replaced by an 18-hole course at some point before September 25, 1953.  It is not clear whether the Maxwells designed the 9 or 18 hole course.  In interviews with Chris Clouser for his book “The Midwest Associate” (2006), Maxwell family members approximated the date of this work to 1948.  We have accepted that date in the absence of more definitive information regarding timing of their work.

Early April             Construction of the Bayou DeSiard Country Club course in Monroe, Louisiana is scheduled to begin in early April and is expected to be completed by September 1.  [Monroe Morning World, February 29, 1948]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell designed the original 9 holes.  However, it seems likely that, even if he didn’t design the original course, Maxwell tweaked it as part of the expansion to 18 holes in 1951.

 

Mid-April               New Austin Country Club layout is approved for play.  [“One Hundred Years of Champions and Change – The History of Austin Country Club”, Frances G. Trimble (1999), Pg. 116]

 

June 6                    Oakwood Country Club in Enid is open at least by this date.  [The Daily Oklahoman, June 6, 1948]

 

June 12                  Lawton Golf & Country Club opens with grass greens.  [Lawton Constitution, June 10, 1948]

 

July 22                   Work on Randolph Oaks golf course at Randolph Air Force base near San Antonio is “in progress.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 22, 1948]

 

September 1         Nine-hole Bayou DeSiard Country Club course in Monroe, Louisiana expected to open around September 1.  [Monroe News Star, July 25, 1948]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell designed the original 9 holes.  However, it seems likely that, even if he didn’t design the original course, Maxwell tweaked it as part of the expansion to 18 holes in 1951.

 

September 17       Maxwell is briefly in Ardmore before departing for Shreveport, Louisiana with Press.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 17, 1948]  Editorial Note:  It is possible this trip involved preliminary efforts in connection with the Palmetto Country Club job, which did not begin until the summer of 1950.

 

September 17       Perry and Press Maxwell have just finished the 9-hole course at Randolph Air Force base near San Antonio.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 17, 1948]

 

September 31       Perry and Press Maxwell start building the 9-hole Anderson Golf Course at Fort Hood near Temple, Texas.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 17, 1948]  Editorial Note:  The Anderson Golf Course at Fort Hood no longer exists.

 

1949

Unknown              Maxwell prepares plans for redesign of greens and conversion from sand to grass at Cushing Country Club, but builder did not follow plans so Maxwell refuses to allow his name to be attached. [The Daily Oklahoman, March 26, 1957]

 

February 25          Final grooming of Austin Country Club layout will start soon.  [Austin American, February 25, 1949]

 

March 20              The first official golf tournament held on the Bayou DeSiard Country Club course in Monroe, Louisiana, which was “completed a few months ago”.  [Monroe News Star, March 18, 1949; Monroe Morning World, March 20, 1949]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell designed the original 9 holes.  However, it seems likely that, even if he didn’t design the original course, Maxwell tweaked it as part of the expansion to 18 holes in 1951.

 

March 26              Maxwell speaks at a “greenskeepers’ meeting” in Tulsa.  [Joplin Globe, March 27, 1949]

 

March 30              Maxwell is selected to design 18-hole course at University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma.  [The Daily Oklahoman, March 31, 1949]

 

June 1                    Members are expected to be able to start playing the new Austin Country Club course on June 1.  [Austin American, February 25, 1949]

 

June 20                  Maxwell attends the women’s Western Open at Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club.  [The Daily Oklahoman, June 21, 1949]

 

July 12                   Maxwell submits a bid to the Oklahoma City council for the design and construction of an 18-hole golf course at Lake Hefner.  Maxwell’s bid was the only one presented and a contract was expected to be let “next week”.  Under the proposal, Maxwell would build the course using his own money and recoup his investment through an operating lease with title expected to revert to the city after 10 years. Construction of the course is expected to take 18 months.  [The Daily Oklahoman, July 13, 1949; The Daily Oklahoman, July 12, 1992]

 

July 13                   The University of Oklahoma board of regents authorizes the president to start plans on a new 18-hole golf course.  Maxwell “has been negotiating with the university on the plans.  No definite arrangements have yet been made.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, July 14, 1949]

 

October 12            University of Oklahoma regents award contract to Maxwell for 18-hole golf course.  “The course, to cost $84,300, is expected to be ready for play September, 1950”.  [Miami (OK) Daily News, October 13, 1949]

 

October 17            Work begins on University of Oklahoma golf course.  [Miami (OK) Daily News, October 13, 1949]

 

October 22            Maxwell to construct grass green course in Clinton, Oklahoma.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 23, 1949]

 

October 22            Maxwell is “supervising construction of courses at the University of Oklahoma and at Lake Hefner, near Oklahoma City.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 23, 1949]

CONTINUE TO 1950