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TIMELINE

(1930s)

1930

Unknown              Front 9 sand greens at Hillcrest Country Club in Bartlesville, Oklahoma replaced with bermuda grass.  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 16, 1957]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell was involved with this work.

 

Unknown              Maxwell adds the back nine holes at Crystal Downs on the higher plateau parallel to Lake Michigan. [“The Life and Work of Dr. Alister MacKenzie”, by Tom Doak, James S. Scott and Raymund M. Haddock (2001), Pg. 131]

 

January 18            Maxwell confers with Corpus Christi, Texas city officials “in regard to establishing a privately owned golf course…Mr. Maxwell expects to make a survey of several available locations of the proposed course during the next few days.”   [Corpus Christi Caller-Times, January 19, 1930]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether a course was ever designed or built by Maxwell in Corpus Christi.

 

March 3-19           Maxwell and his sister and brother-in-law are on “a leisurely motor trip” to Florida before returning to Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 7, 1930; Daily Ardmoreite, March 21, 1930]

 

March 15              Work on the Rochelle Town and Country Club course resumes with workmen “blasting and clearing the grounds.”  [Rockford (IL) Daily Register Gazette, March 15, 1930]

 

March 25              Maxwell leaves Ardmore “on an eastern business trip.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 25, 1930]

 

April 18                  Eight of the nine greens at Rochelle Town and Country Club are roughed in and rapid progress made on completing fairways and seeding greens.  The work is being done under the supervision of Perry Maxwell.  [Rockford (IL) Daily Register Gazette, April 18, 1930]

 

April 19                  Northside Country Club takes over possession of the Jeffersonville Country Club in Prather, Indiana, which “is no more.”  Maxwell constructed the course three years prior.  [Courier-Journal, April 9, 1930]  Editorial Note:  The relationship between Jeffersonville and Northside is murky.  While there are several articles relating to Northside replacing Jeffersonville in 1930, there are also articles continuing to reference Jeffersonville thereafter.  Regardless, it appears that the club ultimately failed and was sold at auction in 1941.

 

May 7                    Maxwell is “in the east building courses”.  [Daily Ardmoreite, May 7, 1930]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear which courses Maxwell was working on “in the east” since his known projects at the time were in the Midwest (Michigan and Illinois) and Oklahoma.  It is possible, however, that the work described in this article includes Pine Valley.

June 9                    Maxwell is in Oklahoma City for the state amateur tournament at Twin Hills.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 10, 1930]

 

July 1                     G.A. Nichols finalizes land swap with Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club and Nichols Hills courses become Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club.  [The Daily Oklahoman, June 29, 1930]

 

July 31                   Nine-hole Rochelle Town and Country Club course informally opens for play with bent grass greens.  [Rockford (IL) Daily Register Gazette, July 30, 1930]

 

September 11       Maxwell to join his daughters in Michigan and then accompany them on their trip east.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 11, 1930]  Editorial Note:  In interviews with Chris Clouser for his book “The Midwest Associate” (2006), family members confirmed that Maxwell spent the summer of 1930 in Ann Arbor, Michigan working on the University of Michigan course.  We accept their recollection of events in the absence of any information to the contrary.

 

September 18       University of Michigan course expected to open.  [Appleton (WI) Post, March 26, 1930]

 

September 22       Maxwell attends U.S. Amateur and watches Bobby Jones complete the Grand Slam.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 11, 1930]

 

December 21        Maxwell is joined in New York City by his daughters Dora and Mary Belle, for a Christmas visit.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 21, 1930]

 

1931

 

Unknown              Back 9 sand greens at Hillcrest Country Club in Bartlesville, Oklahoma replaced with bent grass.  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 16, 1957]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell was involved with this work.

 

Unknown              Work proceeds on building the back nine holes and improving the front nine holes at Crystal Downs.  [“Crystal Downs Country Club”, Frederick R. Baird (1981)]

 

Unknown              Maxwell remodels the 6th hole and “nearly all” of the greens at the Philadelphia Country Club’s Spring Mill course.  [Dallas Morning News, January 21, 1932; July 7, 1938 and July 26, 1938 letters from the Chairman of Golf Committee]

February                Maxwell hired to design 9-hole Princeton Golf & Country Club course in Princeton, Kentucky.  Maxwell comes to Princeton and “the location of the greens were established.”  The club contracts with Maxwell “for one of his men experienced in building golf courses, to supervise the construction of the greens.”  [Early History of Princeton Golf and Country Club, Unknown Publication]

 

February 10          Maxwell heads efforts by the local chapter of the Red Cross to distribute potatoes to drought stricken areas of Carter County, Oklahoma.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 10, 1931]

 

March 29              Maxwell “given a contract to remodel the Pine Valley golf course near Philadelphia.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 29, 1931]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether this is a reference to the work credited to Maxwell in 1929 or a contract for additional work.  We note that “The Architects of Golf” by Geoffrey S. Cornish and Ronald E. Whitten (1981) dates Maxwell’s work at Pine Valley to 1933 and “The Midwest Associate” by Chris Clouser (2006) dates them to 1933-1935.

Spring                     University of Michigan course opens.  [The University of Michigan Golf Course, Wm. Slack, Jr., May 1945 Michigan Greenkeepers Report]

May 4                     P. D. Maxwell is “seated at the speakers table” at the annual golf dinner at Irem Country Club in Dallas, Pennsylvania “following the opening of the additional nine holes for play” which increased the course to 27 holes.  [Scranton Times-Tribune, May 4, 1931]  Editorial Note:  We assume the referenced person is Maxwell, who often went by his first and middle initials.  If so, it would seem unusual for Maxwell to speak at an event relating to the opening of an additional nine holes if he wasn’t involved in some way.  At this point, his presence is merely suspicious and, as a result, we haven’t listed Irem Country Club as a course Maxwell worked on.  However, we hope to find evidence clarifying whether or not he was involved.

July 23-25             Maxwell is in Tulsa for “a few days.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 26, 1931]

October 12            Maxwell accompanies his daughter Mary Belle to Galveston, Texas, where she will depart by ship for a year in France to study art history at the University of Paris.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 18, 1931]

 

November             G.A. Nichols writes to Maxwell thanking him for his efforts in construction of the Nichols Hills courses.  “At the time you did this work, not knowing very much about golf courses myself, all that we had to depend on was your past record and recommendations.”  [“The Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club - The First Century”, by Bob Burke (2012), Pg. 135]

 

November 11       Site for Walnut Hill Country Club in Dallas expected to be ready for Maxwell to start work on laying out 36-holes in detail.  [Dallas Morning News, November 6, 1931]

 

November 30       Maxwell has “just started a $100,000 course at Dallas, which will also be equipped with watered fairways.”  [Longview (TX) News-Journal, December 1, 1931]  Editorial Note:  The Dallas course referenced in this article is almost certainly Walnut Hill Country Club.

 

November 30       Maxwell meets with the President of Pine Crest Country Club in Longview, Texas regarding possibly adding nine holes to their existing course.  [Longview (TX) News-Journal, December 1, 1931]  Editorial Note:  No evidence has been uncovered indicating that Perry Maxwell actually worked on the Pine Crest course.  According to the club’s website, Press Maxwell added a second nine holes to the course in 1958.

 

Nov 30-Dec 1       Maxwell is in Longview, Texas for the P.G.A. Southwest Open at Pine Crest Country Club [Longview (TX) News-Journal, December 1, 1931]

 

1932

Unknown              Front 9 greens at Hillcrest Country Club in Bartlesville, Oklahoma replaced with bent grass.  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 16, 1957]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell was involved with this work.

 

January 20            Maxwell is in Dallas laying out the Walnut Hill Country Club courses.  [Dallas Morning News, January 21, 1932]

 

April 25-27            Maxwell is in Oklahoma City for “a few days” accompanied by his daughter, Dora.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 25, 1932]

 

April 27                  Maxwell is “on the job now, shaping up greens and fairways and anything else that needs attention” at Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club in advance of the Trans-Mississippi tournament.  Improvements include a new back tee on 3rd hole, changes to the green and surrounds on the 5th hole and white sand added to bunkers.  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 27, 1932]

May 24                  Indian Hills Country Club in Tulsa reported with bent grass greens.  [The Daily Oklahoman, May 24, 1932]

 

June 11                  Maxwell visits family in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 12, 1932]  Editorial Note:  This article notes that Maxwell is building an unnamed course in Tulsa.  It is possible that course is Avery Golf Club.

 

June 20-25            Trans-Mississippi golf tournament held at Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club.  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 27, 1932]

 

July 6                     Maxwell announces the “recent” marriage of his daughter, Elizabeth, in New York.  Maxwell presumably attends wedding.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 6, 1932]

September 28       Construction has begun on the “new course” at the Hillcrest Country Club in Coffeyville, Kansas, including scooping dirt from the old 5th fairway to form the new 8th green and clearing of the new 2nd fairway.  [Coffeyville Daily Journal, September 29, 1932]

 

October 12            Maxwell and local contractor “Ducky” Marshall have made “remarkable progress” on the new Hillcrest Country Club course in Coffeyville, Kansas since construction started 2 weeks ago.  All greens except for the 1st and 2nd have been “roughed up” and all tees shaped.  An irrigation system is being installed to water the grass greens and tees.  [Coffeyville Daily Journal, October 13, 1932]

 

October 15            18-holes at Walnut Hill Country Club in Dallas officially opens.  The course is “designed after the Pacific Coast’s best courses.”  A second 18-hole course is expected to be complete by the spring of 1933.  The rough work on the second course has “already been laid and about all that remains is the planting of grass.”   [Dallas Morning News, October 23, 1932]

 

November 2          All greens have been planted and fairways plowed for planting in the spring at the Hillcrest Country Club course in Coffeyville, Kansas.  [Coffeyville Daily Journal, November 2, 1932]

 

December 1          Maxwell states that he has averaged driving 100 miles a day in his car since March 1.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 1, 1932]

 

December 17        Maxwell arranges a radio party with the Ardmore Philharmonic club to listen to a broadcast of a concert by the Philadelphia Symphony.  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 18, 1932]

 

1933

Unknown              All eighteen holes at Crystal Downs completed and open for play.  [“Crystal Downs Country Club”, Frederick R. Baird (1981)]

 

January 2              Maxwell serves as a pallbearer at the funeral of J.W. Hignight.  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 2, 1933]

 

January 22            Maxwell is a pallbearer at the funeral of Lee Cruce, the second governor of Oklahoma, in Ardmore.  [The Daily Oklahoman, January 23, 1933]

 

June 18                  Hillcrest Country Club in Coffeyville, Kansas officially opens “new” 9-hole course with grass greens and tees designed by Maxwell.  [Coffeyville Daily Journal, June 15, 1933]

 

August 8                A corporate charter for Avery Golf Club, Inc. is issued in the State of Oklahoma.  [https://www.sos.ok.gov/corp/corpInformation.aspx?id=1900078949Editorial Note:  A February 17, 1935 Daily Ardmoreite article on Maxwell’s engagement at Southern Hills notes that “He is well acquainted for his fine work in Tulsa, having constructed…Avery…”  Maxwell presumably designed and built Avery Golf Club at some point between August 8, 1933 (the date of the club’s incorporation) and February 17, 1935 (the date of the Daily Ardmoreite article.  Avery Golf Club was incorporated by Cyrus Avery, who served with Maxwell on the board of the Oklahoma State Chamber of Commerce.

 

September 29       Maxwell, a “landscape architect, is at work…on plans for beautifying the shore line and laying out park sites” in connection with the construction of Lake Murray dam project near Ardmore.  [Ada Weekly News, October 5, 1933]

 

October                  Maxwell introduces seaside bent grass on six greens at Dornick Hills, which is “the farthest south that seaside bent has been successfully grown.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 18, 1934]

 

October 25            Maxwell leaves Ardmore for Philadelphia “on a business trip.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 29, 1933]  Editorial Note:  Although no specifics are given about the reasons for Maxwell’s trip to Philadelphia, it is possible that it related to work on Gulph Mills, Sunnybrook or Pine Valley.

December 27        Maxwell arrives in Ardmore with his daughter, Elizabeth, following “a stay in the east.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, December 31, 1933]

                               

1934

Unknown              Maxwell does minor green renovation project at the old Sunnybrook Golf Club in Flourtown, Pennsylvania.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pgs. 66 and 256]  Editorial Note:  Clouser’s information is based on interviews he conducted with the club.  At least one subsequent report confirms Maxwell worked at Sunnybrook.  [Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1951]

 

Unknown              Maxwell reconstructs 8th hole and relocates 8th and 10th greens at Gulph Mills Golf Club in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.  The 10th hole was likely reduced from a par 5 to a par 4.  [“Gulph Mills Golf Club Design Evolution 1916-1999” by Tom Paul and Charles Lighthall, February 9, 1999]

 

January 4              Maxwell “recently returned from Philadelphia.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 7, 1934]  Editorial Note:  Although no specifics are given about the reasons for Maxwell’s trip to Philadelphia, it is possible that it related to work on Gulph Mills, Sunnybrook or Pine Valley.

January 4-5          Maxwell is enlisted to plan and direct the building of Walker athletic field on 10-acre tract in Ardmore and spent most of two days “on the ground with city officials.  The field “will be used for football, track, tennis and for outdoors meetings.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 7, 1934]

 

January 6              Dr. Alister MacKenzie dies at his home in Santa Cruz, California.  [“The Life and Work of Dr. Alister MacKenzie”, by Tom Doak, James S. Scott and Raymund M. Haddock (2001), Pg. 102]

 

January 8              Maxwell, “landscape expert,” is supervising a crew of transient workers at Walker athletic field site in Ardmore.  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 8, 1934]

 

January 12            Work is “moving ahead progressively” on the Walker athletic field in Ardmore, Oklahoma “under the direction of Perry Maxwell, supervisor in charge.”  Workmen from the transient relief bureau are cutting out heavy timber and undergrowth from the 10-acre site.  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 12, 1934]

 

February 6            Walker athletic field in Ardmore, Oklahoma is approved as a CWA project with Maxwell in charge.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 6, 1934]

 

February 26          Maxwell is “reelected” Secretary of Dornick Hills.  He is also named to the greens, finance and out of town members committees.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 27, 1934]

 

March 18              Maxwell is pleased with the six seaside bent grass greens introduced at Dornick Hills and plans to extend “the system to the other greens at the club.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 18, 1934]

 

March 22-25        Maxwell is in Augusta, Georgia for the Masters tournament.  [The Daily Oklahoman, March 29, 1934]

 

April 10                  Dean Woods leaves Ardmore for Philadelphia where he will be until the fall.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 10, 1934]  Editorial Note:  Although no specifics are given about the reasons for Woods' trip to Philadelphia, it is possible that it related to work on Gulph Mills, Sunnybrook or Pine Valley.

April 14                  Maxwell plays in a tennis tournament in Durant, Oklahoma.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 15, 1934]

 

July 1                     T.H. Riggs-Miller, New York golf course architect, is on his way to Oklahoma to meet with Maxwell and inspect the links of the state.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 1, 1934]

 

September 26       Press Maxwell has entered Philips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 26, 1934]

 

Oct.-Dec.               Maxwell is in New York City on business for several months.  [Daily Ardmoreite, October 17, 1934; Daily Ardmoreite, January 8, 1935]

 

December 5          Maxwell travels to Miami Open.  [New York Times, December 5, 1934]

 

Late                        Marvin Leonard acquires roughly 157 acres in Fort Worth, Texas and immediately begins designing Colonial Country Club with bent grass greens.  Leonard engaged the services of Maxwell and noted architect John Bredemus to assist in the layout.  Leonard asked Maxwell and Bredemus each to submit 5 alternative plans for the course.  Leonard reviewed the recommendations and then asked for 5 more.  Leonard picked elements from each for his overall plan, borrowing from both designers.  [“The Legacy Continues – A 50-Year History of Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas 1936-1986”, by Russ Pate (1986), Pg. 14]  Editorial Note:  Subsequent reports indicate that the course was designed by Maxwell and built by Bredemus. [Shreveport Times, May 11, 1940]

1935

January                 Construction of Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas begins.  [Fort Worth Press, January 24, 1936]

 

January                 Maxwell drives through New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Ohio on his way home to Ardmore from New York City.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 5, 1935]

 

January 8              Maxwell returns to Ardmore “from a stay of several months in New York City.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, January 8, 1935]

 

February                Maxwell profiled in The American Golfer magazine. [“Perry D. Maxwell – Creator of Ardmore” by Bob Davis, The American Golfer, February, 1935]

 

February 11-15    Maxwell signs a contract to design and build Southern Hills and spends the week in Tulsa to begin construction.  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 17, 1935]

 

February 17          Maxwell has “supervised reconstruction work on Oakhurst country club” (now known as Oaks Country Club) in Tulsa.   [Daily Ardmoreite, February 17, 1935]  Editorial Note:  The exact date and nature of this work is not known.  However, we assume that the work relates to the redesign of greens described in the club’s history, but at an earlier date than the 1936-1937 timeframe generally cited, presumably in 1934 or very early 1935. 

 

February 18          Construction starts on Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa.  [Golfdom, January, 1937]

 

April 4-8                Maxwell is in Augusta, Georgia for the Masters tournament.  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 18, 1935]

 

April 7                    Maxwell witnesses Gene Sarazen’s double eagle on the 15th hole at Augusta National Golf Club.  [The Daily Oklahoman, May 17, 1935]

 

April 17                  Maxwell returns to Ardmore from Tulsa, “where he is building a golf course.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 18, 1935]  Editorial Note:  The Tulsa golf course mentioned in this article is presumably Southern Hills.

 

May 3                    Work “already has started” on Colonial Country Club course in Fort Worth with John Bredemus in charge of construction and Ralph Plummer assisting.  [Fort Worth Star Telegram, May 3, 1935]

 

May 18                  Maxwell writes to Jay Monroe concerning possible work at Belleview Biltmore Golf Club in Belleair, Florida.  [May 27, 1935 letter from Jay Monroe]  Editorial Note:  We have no evidence suggesting that Maxwell actually did any work at Belleview Biltmore.

 

May 27                  Jay Monroe writes to Maxwell about an “experimental bent patch at Augusta” that Maxwell was working on.  [May 27, 1935 letter from Jay Monroe]  Editorial Note:  Monroe was a founding member at Augusta National, one of the club’s primary financial backers, its treasurer and confidante of Clifford Roberts.  Accordingly, it appears that Maxwell’s involvement at Augusta National began a full two years earlier than generally recognized.  Maxwell had ample experience installing bent grass greens in climates previously considered too harsh for bent, so it makes sense that Augusta National might turn to him to experiment with bent grass on the course.  

 

June 6                    “Tentative plans” for an 18-hole golf course on the Iowa State University campus in Ames, Iowa have been formulated by Maxwell, “who has gone over the proposed area with college athletic officials.”  Final plans for the golf course will be drawn up if additional lands can be acquired by the University. [Ames Daily Tribune, June 6, 1935]

 

July 24                   Work starts “on a new 18-hole golf course for Lawrence Country Club.  Axes were purchased and men went into 48 acres of new ground to clear it of brush and small trees.  Next will follow seeding of the ground, then a complete change in fairways and grass greens.  The additional ground, north of the present course, was purchased last year making a total of 128.5 acres in the entire tract.”  The project is to be completed by April 1, 1936.  “At that point, the members will a completely new course with all holes rearranged… The new course was designed by J.T. Riggs-Miller who is an expert at such work.  Actual construction will be under the direction of Perry Maxwell, Ardmore, Oklahoma, who has redesigned many courses in eastern states in recent years.”  [Lawrence Daily Journal World, July 24, 1935]  Editorial Note:  The reference to “J.T. Riggs-Miller” is almost certainly a typographical error and should be T.H. Riggs-Miller, who was a landscape and golf course architect.

 

August                   Preliminary work on Iowa State University course in Ames, Iowa begins with tree removal. [Ames Daily Tribune, April 29, 1938]

 

August 13              Southern Hills is “under construction”.  Some of the sodded Bermuda fairways watered “last week”.  [Ada Evening News, August 13, 1935]

 

August 14              Wendell Miller dies in a Tulsa hospital at the age of 39 from complications from a heart attack suffered several weeks previously.  “Miller had been in Tulsa three months supervising the work on the new Southern Hills golf course.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 14, 1935]

 

September             “Experimental bent patch” for Augusta National is expected to be ready in September, 1935.  [May 27, 1935 letter from Jay Monroe]  Editorial Note:  Monroe was a founding member at Augusta National, one of the club’s primary financial backers, its treasurer and confidante of Clifford Roberts.  Accordingly, it appears that Maxwell’s involvement at Augusta National began a full two years earlier than generally recognized.  Maxwell had ample experience installing bent grass greens in climates previously considered too harsh for bent, so it makes sense that Augusta National might turn to him to experiment with bent grass on the course. 

 

September 5         Maxwell arrives in Columbus and is engaged to oversee architectural work on Ohio State Golf Course.  [My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

 

September 6         Maxwell is notified that his daughter, Mary Belle, is among the last group of passengers rescued from a cruise ship stranded of the coast of Florida in a hurricane.  Maxwell leaves Columbus to return to Oklahoma.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 6, 1935; My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

 

September 23       Grading and preparatory work on greens at Lawrence County Club is nearing completion and seeding is expected in next ten days.  [Lawrence Journal-World, September 23, 1935]

 

Sept.-Dec.              Maxwell lays out first nine holes of Prairie Dunes course in Hutchinson, Kansas.  [“Prairie Dunes The First Fifty Years 1937-1987”, by Prairie Dunes Country Club (1987), Pg. 95]

 

October 17            Maxwell “raced in from Tulsa” to attend the PGA Championship played at Twin Hills Country Club in Oklahoma City.  [The Daily Oklahoman, October 18, 1935]

 

October 17-23      The 35th PGA Championship is played at Twin Hills Country Club in Oklahoma City, with Johnny Revolta beating Tommy Armour in the finals.  [The Daily Oklahoman, October 24, 1935]

 

October 28            Construction begins on Ohio State Golf Course with Maxwell and George McClure staking out greens, fairways and tees.  [My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

 

November 21       Maxwell spends Thanksgiving in Tulsa.  [My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

 

December              WPA assistance begins at Iowa State University course and continues through to completion. [Ames Daily Tribune, April 29, 1938]

 

December 2          Maxwell returns to Columbus and is engaged to oversee architectural work on Ohio State Golf Course.  [My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

 

December 7          Maxwell returns to Oklahoma for the holidays.  [My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

 
 
 
 
 

1936

Unknown              Maxwell remodels the Links Golf Club in Roslyn, New York.  [“The Architects of Golf” by Geoffrey S. Cornish and Ronald E. Whitten (1981); The Daily Oklahoman, May 23, 1993; “The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 253]  Editorial Note:  Multiple modern sources credit Maxwell with working on the Links Club.  It is not clear, however, exactly when this work occurred and what he did. 

 

Early                      Maxwell’s involvement with Ohio State Golf Course ends.  [My Home Course – Ohio State University Golf Course, Tom MacWood, September 27, 2000]

 

Unknown              Maxwell moves the 10th green, 11th tee and 12th tee at Dornick Hills in Ardmore, Oklahoma.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 29]

 

Unknown              Greens at Oak Hills Country Club in Ada, Oklahoma are converted to bent grass.  [The Oklahoman, February 19, 1957]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell was involved with this work.

 

Unknown              Maxwell remodels 2 holes at Oaks Country Club (f/k/a Oakhurst Country Club) in Tulsa.   [The Oklahoman March 4, 1957]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether this work is different than the work attributed to Maxwell in 1935 and/or 1937.

Unknown              Maxwell is engaged to redesign the original nine holes and add a second nine holes at the Topeka Country Club course in Topeka, Kansas.  [https://www.topekacc.org/Club-Info.aspx]

Unknown              Bent grass greens are installed at Muskogee Country Club.  [The Daily Oklahoman, April 12, 1957]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether Maxwell was involved with the conversion to bent grass greens. 

 

January 16            Maxwell attends a dinner at the Tulsa Country Club where A.W. Tillinghast is the featured speaker.  [January 16, 1936 letter from A.W. Tillinghast to the President of the PGA]

 

January 29            Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas officially opens for play.  [Fort Worth Press, January 24, 1936]

 

April 1                    “Maxwell’s superintendent, Dean Woods, and a crew of local workers commenced work on the course” at Prairie Dunes in Hutchinson, Kansas.  [“Prairie Dunes The First Fifty Years 1937-1987”, by Prairie Dunes Country Club (1987), Pg. 95]

 

April 5                    Maxwell arrives in Augusta for the Masters.  [Augusta Chronicle, April 5, 1936]

 

May 12                  Maxwell speaks at Iowa Greenskeepers association annual spring meeting in Ames, Iowa.  [Mason City (IA) Globe Gazette, May 12, 1936]

May 30                  New Lawrence County Club course opens.  [Lawrence Journal-World, May 26, 1936]

June 21                  Maxwell returns home to Ardmore from New York City with his daughter, Mary Belle.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 21, 1936]

 

July 13                     Maxwell has completed the layout of the 9-hole McPherson Country Club golf course in McPherson, Kansas and work has commenced.  Club officials are considering Maxwell’s recommendation of grass greens for the course.  [Unknown Newspaper, July 13, 1936]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether the initial course had sand greens or the grass greens that Maxwell recommended.

 

July 19                   Press Maxwell returns home to Ardmore after two months in Ames, Iowa working with his father on the Iowa State University golf course.  [Daily Ardmoreite, July 19, 1946; Daily Ardmoreite, July 20, 1936]

 

August 25              Maxwell accompanies his daughter Dora and son Press on a trip to the east.  [Daily Ardmoreite, August 26, 1936]

 

Early Fall               McPherson Country Club golf course in McPherson, Kansas expected to be ready for play.  [Unknown Newspaper, July 13, 1936]

 

October 3              Maxwell has “just returned” to Oklahoma from Ames, Iowa where the layout of the Iowa State University golf course has been completed.  [The Daily Oklahoman, October 4, 1936]

 

October 3              Maxwell in Oklahoma City for the state golf championship at Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club.  [The Daily Oklahoman, October 4, 1936]

 

November 15       Maxwell returns to Ardmore from Hutchinson, Kansas.  [Daily Ardmoreite, November 16, 1936]

 

December 21        Maxwell “supervising preliminary work” on Prairie Dunes in Hutchinson, Kansas.  Greens are being graded and prepared for top soil.  “Fairways also have been turned over, ready for planting of grass.”  [Hutchinson News, December 21, 1936]

1937

Unknown              Maxwell reconstructs the 11th and 14th holes at Gulph Mills Golf Club in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, including relocating the 11th and 14th greens and tees and adding a fairway pot bunker on #11.  Pars were swapped on the two holes.  [“Gulph Mills Golf Club Design Evolution 1916-1999” by Tom Paul and Charles Lighthall, February 9, 1999]

Unknown              Maxwell redesigns 7 greens at Oaks Country Club (f/k/a Oakhurst Country Club) in Tulsa.   [Club history “Oaks Country Club Nostalgia”]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether this work is different than the work attributed to Maxwell in 1935 and/or 1936.

 

March 7                 9th hole (currently the 18th) at Dornick Hills “is being revamped to penalize the wild swingers who come slicing up the fairway.  Under the direction of Dean Woods, foreman of construction for Perry Maxwell, nationally-known golf architect, a sand trap is being installed on the west side.  Another suggestion from Woods that will be carried out is the filling in and sodding of traps back of the famous cliff hole” (original #7, current #16).  [Daily Ardmoreite, March 7, 1937]

 

March 17              Plans proceeding for 9-hole Prairie Dunes course on approximately 100 acres selected by Maxwell out of a larger 480 acre tract.  Plans include Bermuda grass fairways, Coos bent greens and the installation of a fairway irrigation system.  [Hutchinson News, March 17, 1937]

 

March 22              Dean Woods arrives in Hutchinson to superintend remaining work at Prairie Dunes, including grading top soil on greens and construction of an irrigation reservoir.  [Hutchinson News, March 22, 1937]

 

March 27              Maxwell is in Shreveport, Louisiana and plays golf match at Shreveport Country Club.  “Maxwell expressed a keen interest in the local course, and said with certain improvements, it could be made one of the best in the Southwest district.”  [The (Shreveport) Times, March 28, 1937]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear whether there was a purpose to Maxwell's visit to Shreveport Country Club other than to play in the mentioned golf match.  We have found no other references to Maxwell at Shreveport Country Club.  Accordingly, in the absence of any evident connecting Maxwell to work at Shreveport Country Club, we have not listed it in the Courses section of this website.

Spring                     Southern Hills is expected to be “ready for use in the spring”.  [Florence (SC) Morning News, February 29, 1936]

 

April 3                    Work starts on installation of large plant and sprinkling system for Prairie Dunes.  “Wells are being drilled.”  [Hutchinson News, April 3, 1937]

 

April 10-15            Coos bent grass to be planted on greens at Prairie Dunes.  [Hutchinson News, March 22, 1937]

 

April 15                  Maxwell returns to Ardmore from Philadelphia and “other points in the east.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 16, 1937]

April 26-30            Maxwell is “in Hutchinson this week to trace construction progress” at Prairie Dunes.  “Most of the water lines have been constructed…  Nearly a dozen men were busy today grading greens, preparatory to planting.”  [Hutchinson News, April 3, 1937]

 

May                       Bermuda grass fairways are to be sown at Prairie Dunes.  [Hutchinson News, March 22, 1937]

 

June 4                    The last of grass planting done on fairways and all construction work at Prairie Dunes completed except for the clubhouse.  Greens are a “velvety carpet of bent grass that is almost ready for play.”  Construction of 2,000,000 gallon irrigation reservoir completed.  [Hutchinson News, June 5, 1937]

 

Summer                 800 truckloads of sod are placed on the hills at the Iowa State University course “which were eroding.” [Ames Daily Tribune, April 29, 1938]

 

Summer                 Maxwell remodels the 17th green at Augusta National and adds three bunkers at the front.  Clifford Roberts was not pleased, writing to Maxwell “I do not think you should have banked up the left-hand back side of the green.  This is supposed to be a run-up hole.  You have changed the character of the hole by inviting players to pitch it to the green.”  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

Unknown              Maxwell eliminates the long front tongue on the 18th green at Augusta National after the 1937 Masters.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]  Editorial Note:  Whitten also notes that the old 16th green was expanded to the left and the two hillside bunkers pulled closer to the green after the 1937 Masters.  While Maxwell is not credited with this work, it seems highly likely that he was responsible since he was making other changes to the course during that exact time.

 

Unknown              Maxwell fills in the bunker on the left side of the 1st hole at Augusta National.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 93]

 

August 5                Maxwell is in Hutchinson, Kansas for picnic supper with charter members of Prairie Dunes to “explain how he planned the course in the billowing sand dunes.”  [Hutchinson News, August 5, 1937]

August 7                Maxwell is in Oklahoma City to “make some needed repairs on Twin Hills’ No. 8 green.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, August 8, 1937]

 

September 4         Prairie Dunes opens for member play.  Dean Woods plays in inaugural foursome.  “Opening with a nine hole layout, the Carey brothers, sponsors of the course, plan to increase the distance to 18 holes in the near future and later add 18 more holes.”  [Hutchinson News, September 4, 1937]

 

September 11       Press Maxwell leaves Ardmore to attend Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire.  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 13, 1937]

 

September 12       Maxwell is in Hutchinson, Kansas for formal opening of Prairie Dunes marked by exhibition match including Johnny Dawson and Dean Woods.  [Hutchinson News, September 12, 1937]

 

Late Fall                Maxwell begins work at Augusta National on 5th, 7th, 10th and 17th greens and to remove the artificial “sand dunes” MacKenzie created to imitate Scottish links. [Augusta Chronicle, January 22, 1938]

 

Unknown              Maxwell removes the front tongue of the 3rd green at Augusta National and reshapes the bunkers.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

 

Unknown              Maxwell reshapes the 5th green at Augusta National to create ocean-wave contours.  The change was noted as "a definite improvement" by Clifford Roberts, most likely referring to drainage concerns, not playability.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

 

Unknown              Maxwell rebuilds the 6th green at Augusta National, “a reconstruction that removed the mound, left much of the Redan-like left-side contour intact, and added a prominent right-side shelf.”  [“The Evolution of the Golf Course at Augusta National: What Would The Good Doctor Say?”, by Daniel Wexler (2012), http://www.golfclubatlas.com/in-my-opinion/wexler-daniel-augusta/]

 

Unknown              Maxwell reshapes portions of Augusta National’s 7th green at Clifford Roberts’ request.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

Unknown              Maxwell builds a new bunkered 10th green at Augusta National up the hill beyond and to the left of MacKenzie’s original green.  [“The Evolution of the Golf Course at Augusta National: What Would The Good Doctor Say?”, by Daniel Wexler (2012), http://www.golfclubatlas.com/in-my-opinion/wexler-daniel-augusta/]

                               

December 21-22 Maxwell and Dean Woods meet with E.R. Steiniger and Fred Grau at Dornick Hills. [Steiniger and Grau Travel Log]

 

1938

Unknown              Maxwell rebuilds the 4th green at Augusta National, “diminishing its pitch and turning it more towards the 90-degree, L-shaped configuration of the present.”  [“The Evolution of the Golf Course at Augusta National: What Would The Good Doctor Say?”, by Daniel Wexler (2012), http://www.golfclubatlas.com/in-my-opinion/wexler-daniel-augusta/]  The changes included widening the left tongue pushing the bunkers closer to the collar.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

Unknown              Maxwell builds a new bunkered “postage stamp” 7th green at Augusta National on a rise behind the original green.  [“The Evolution of the Golf Course at Augusta National: What Would The Good Doctor Say?”, by Daniel Wexler (2012), http://www.golfclubatlas.com/in-my-opinion/wexler-daniel-augusta/]  Maxwell was directed to “make the new green similar to the par-4 eighth at Pine Valley.”  He added three bunkers in front of the new green.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

Unknown              Clifford Roberts asks Maxwell to totally redesign and debunker the 9th green to eliminate any reward for playing down the 1st fairway.  The boomerang green was removed and five new bunkers were added to the left hillside, creating a distinct advantage for a drive placed on the right side.  Roberts did not the new green's “pancake appearance”, writing Maxwell that it “looks like something you'd expect to see on a public links.”  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

Unknown              Maxwell re-shapes the 18th green at Augusta National.  [“The Evolution of the Golf Course at Augusta National: What Would The Good Doctor Say?”, by Daniel Wexler (2012), http://www.golfclubatlas.com/in-my-opinion/wexler-daniel-augusta/]

 

Unknown              Maxwell redesigns the greens at Hillandale Golf Club in Durham, North Carolina.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 256]  Editorial Note:  Descriptions of the scope and timing of Maxwell's work at Hillandale vary widely.  Clouser references a greens redesign in 1938.  Both the May 23, 1993 Daily Oklahoman and “The Architects of Golf” by Geoffrey S. Cornish and Ronald E. Whitten (1981) describe a remodel in 1930.  And the course's website states that Maxwell designed the second nine holes without giving a date.  While acknowledging a high degree of uncertainty, until clarifying information is found, we have listed Hillandale per Clouser's account since we believe it is the most plausible.  The 1930 date seems unlikely since all of Maxwell's other work in North Carolina occurred from 1938-1940.  Similarly, we question whether Maxwell designed a second nine since Donald Ross appears to have expanded the course to 18 hole course in 1928.

Unknown              Maxwell reconstructs the 7th hole at Gulph Mills Golf Club in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, including reconstructing and relocating the green and tees, rerouting the fairway and adding a new back tee.  Maxwell also recommended that the 7th hole be played from the shorter tees (425-465 yards).  [“Gulph Mills Golf Club Design Evolution 1916-1999” by Tom Paul and Charles Lighthall, February 9, 1999]

 

Unknown              Maxwell’s work to redesign the original nine and add a second nine at the Topeka Country Club course in Topeka, Kansas is under way.  [https://www.topekacc.org/Club-Info.aspx]

 

Unknown              After the 1938 Masters, Clifford Roberts asks Maxwell to add back a portion of a tongue that had existed on the front right on MacKenzie's original version of the 9th green at Augusta National, thinking it should be visible from the fairway and permit run-up shots.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

Unknown              Clifford Roberts writes to Maxwell after the 1938 Masters that the 10th hole “is now a grand golf hole....I know Bob [Jones] is particularly pleased.”  Jones apparently liked that the green could be reached with an iron on the second shot if players took advantage of slopes off the tee.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

Unknown              Clifford Roberts directs Maxwell to enlarge the right side of the 12th green at Augusta National by digging out dirt from the bank behind the green.  Roberts originally wanted the rocks on the bank exposed so that “a very strong shot will strike the rock and bounce most anywhere.”  However, he later changed his mind, so did not expose the rocks and turned the pits into bunkers.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-nationalEditorial Note:  While Whitten describes the expansion of the 12th green as 1939 change, a prior newspaper article indicates this work was done no later than November 1938.  [Dayton Daily News, November 12, 1938]

 

February 17          Brook Hollow announces plans for “improvement of the greens.” [Dallas Morning News, February 17, 1938]

 

February 22          Dean Woods is in Dallas for an “indefinite stay” while he “is engaged in work on one of the Dallas country clubs.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, February 22, 1938]  Editorial Note:  The referenced club is presumably Brook Hollow.

 

April 24                  Maxwell is in Ardmore.  He “has been supervising the reconditioning of greens at Brook Hollow in Dallas.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, April 29, 1938]

May 7                    Maxwell says that the job of rebuilding Augusta National Golf Club is “not completed” and that he “seeks to remove certain piles of dirt which were tossed up for the purpose of making the natives imagine they were surrounded by British coastal sand dunes.”  [The Dayton Daily News, May 8, 1938]

May 10                  Maxwell “recently revised five greens” at Augusta National.  [Ames Daily Tribune, May 10, 1938]

 

May 12                  Iowa State University golf course in Ames, Iowa officially opens.  All fairways are irrigated and course includes a 22,225 sf. practice green which is described as “the largest in the world.”  [Ames Daily Tribune, May 10, 1938]  Maxwell is present at the dedication ceremonies.  [The Courier (Waterloo, IA), May 13, 1938]  

 

July 29                   Maxwell is acknowledged as the architect of the redesigned 11th hole at Brook Hollow, including changing “the putting surface from a flat, pancake affair into a rolling, almost mountainous green with plenty of twists and turns.”  [Dallas Morning News, July 29, 1938]

 

September 1         Maxwell returns to Ardmore “from the east where he has been engaged in golf course work.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, September 4, 1938]

 

November             Maxwell prepares a “Preliminary Sketch Rerouting” plan for Ekwanok Country Club in Manchester, Vermont.  [Maxwell plan dated November, 1938]  Editorial Note:  It does not appear that Maxwell’s full plan, which rerouted certain holes, was actually implemented.  However, subsequent reports of Maxwell's works at Ekwanok indicate that, at a minimum, he renovated the greens in advance of the 1940 national intercollegiate golf tournament.

 

November             Maxwell has been retained “to make a study of the two golf courses” at Maidstone following extensive damage from September hurricane “with a view to making changes that would improve the courses”.  [“The Maidstone Links”, by David Goddard (1997), Pg. 106]  Editorial Note:  Goddard relies on club minutes from November 14, 1938.

 

December 6          Construction begins on Old Town in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.  [Winston-Salem (NC) Journal, July 20, 1939]

December 9          Maxwell was in Manchester, Vermont “this week” where it was decided that the new clubhouse at Ekwanok Country Club would be built on the old tennis court site.  [Rutland (VT) Daily Herald, December 10, 1938]  Editorial Note:  This report follows on the heels of Maxwell’s November, 1938 rerouting plan for Ekwanok.  It does not appear that Maxwell’s full plan was actually implemented; perhaps because, notwithstanding this report, it seems the new clubhouse was built on essentially the same site as the old clubhouse, making the rerouting less practical.

1939

Unknown              Maxwell works on National Golf Links of America in Southampton, New York.  [“The Architects of Golf” by Geoffrey S. Cornish and Ronald E. Whitten (1981); The Daily Oklahoman, May 23, 1993; “The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 253]  Editorial Note:  Multiple modern sources credit Maxwell with working on NGLA.  It is not clear, however, when and what he did.  According to Clouser, Maxwell’s work included re-bunkering the 8th hole and possibly remodeling the 1st green.

 

Unknown              Maxwell remodels East and West courses at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pennsylvania.  [“The Architects of Golf” by Geoffrey S. Cornish and Ronald E. Whitten (1981); The Daily Oklahoman, May 23, 1993; “The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 253]  Editorial Note: We have included Merion in this timeline since multiple modern sources credit him with working on the courses.  However, we have not found any supporting contemporaneous accounts and continue to search for information confirming such credit.

 

Unknown              Maxwell merges a lower deck to the putting surface of the 14th green at Augusta National and adds two fairway knobs on the right so that golfers playing run up shots had to deal with the potential for bad bounces.  [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

Unknown              Maxwell completes 9-hole design at Blackwell Golf Course in Blackwell, Oklahoma.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 253]  Editorial Note:  Clouser’s information is based on interviews he conducted with the club.  Maxwell’s course appears to have replaced an earlier course designed by Amber Anderson of Wichita, Kansas in 1922.

 

Unknown              Maxwell restores Rockaway Hunting Club course on Long Island damaged by the great hurricane of 1938.  The work is believed to include the 15th and 16th greens.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 103]  Editorial Note:  Maxwell’s nephew, Morton Woods, Jr., recalled working with Maxwell on the Rockaway Hunting Club course in interviews with Chris Clouser for his book.  The work is believed to have included the 15th and 16th greens. 

 

Unknown              Maxwell redesigns holes 1-6 and 18 of Westchester Country Club’s West course, including alterations to the 1st hole and the creation of a new 5th hole.  [“The Midwest Associate”, by Christopher Clouser (2006), Pg. 103]  Editorial Note:  Clouser’s information is based in part on interviews he conducted with now deceased descendants of Maxwell.  We accept their recollection of events in the absence of any information to the contrary.  We also note that Westchester is mentioned in a March 31, 1981 letter from Press Maxwell recalling courses that his father worked on.

 

January 1              “First shovel bit the soil” at Old Town in Winston-Salem- North Carolina.  [“Charming – is the word for Winston”, by R.E. Lauterbach, GOLF magazine, circa May/June 1940]

 

January                 Maxwell submits proposes for reconstructing the golf courses at Maidstone, which are presented to the board.  “Maxwell suggested three alternative plans, only the first of which was essentially adopted: 1) Put both courses back in condition without making any material changes or improvements to either of them. 2) Reduce the East Course to nine and give up the seven ocean holes on the Further Lane property. 3) Reconstruct both courses and make ‘considerable improvements’ in the West Course.  The cost of the first plan was estimated at $10,000; the third was projected at $27,000.”  The third plan was recommended by the golf reconstruction committee and received the board’s “provisional blessing” but it appears Maxwell was only paid $150 for his initial report and there is no written record of Maxwell returning.   [“The Maidstone Links”, by David Goddard (1997), Pgs. 106-108]  Editorial Note:  Goddard relies on club minutes from January 16, 1939.  Some of the ideas in Maxwell’s third plan included moving the 7th green to the 8th tee site and relocating the 8th tee to the top of the dune; moving the 9th green to the site of the 14th tee, making it into a par 5; and relocating the 13th green and 14th tee to accommodate the changes to 9.  Goddard notes that while these changes were not made, there are indications some of Maxwell’s other suggestions were adopted by the golf committee between 1939 and 1941.  According to the January 9, 1940 Brooklyn Eagle, Maxwell prepared a plan “last year” which included alterations to holes 1, 2, 8, 9, 14 and 15.  We assume this is the same plan referenced in Goddard’s book.

 

January 31            Groundbreaking occurs on WPA funded Reynolds Park in Winston-Salem.  [Greensboro Daily News, June 1, 1940]  Editorial Note:  It is not clear exactly whether construction of golf course commenced with groundbreaking of the park or at a later date. 

 

February 5            Huntington Crescent Club in Huntington, New York announces plans to rearrange and consolidate their east and west courses as part of a reorganization of the club out of bankruptcy.  [Brooklyn Eagle, February 5, 1939]  Editorial Note:  The “Huntington Beach Club, Long Is.” is noted in a March 31, 1981 letter from Press Maxwell recalling courses that his father worked on.  Maxwell’s nephew, Also, Morton Woods, Jr., recalled working with Maxwell on the Huntington Crescent Club course in interviews with Chris Clouser for his book “The Midwest Associate” (2006). It is assumed that Maxwell’s work at Huntington Crescent Club occurred in 1939-1940 when he was working on Long Island courses after the great hurricane of 1938.  Accordingly, while Maxwell is not mentioned, it seems a strong possibility that he carried out the work described in this article.

 

February 7            Maxwell is in Kansas City at National Turf Conference and Equipment Show sponsored by the Greenkeeping Superintendents Association to judge a model green building contest among some of the “nations best greenkeeping minds.”  [Miami Herald, January 25, 1939] 

 

Feb./Mar.            “The seventh, sixteenth and eighteenth greens will be rearranged and made smaller during February or March at the Brook Hollow Club in keeping with the modernization program at that course.” [Dallas Morning News, December 25, 1938]  Editorial Note:  Although Maxwell is not mentioned, it seems clear this work is a continuation of the remodeling of Brook Hollow’s greens that Maxwell started in 1938.

March 12              New owners of Twin Hills have had “conferences” with Maxwell and “he may be retained to restore the course to its former status.”  The course is “now a haggard and unkempt layout.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, March 12, 1939]

May 5                    Maxwell is “engaged to dress up” Twin Hills in Oklahoma City by the new owners.  The course will close “as soon as Perry returns from the east in a week or so, and not opened again until September” of 1939.  The course will be “completely re-done.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, May 5, 1939]

 

May 8-11              “Tools and equipment were moved by local WPA workers this week to Lake Mt. Pleasant to begin preliminary work of sodding land and construction of a municipal golf course.”  Maxwell is not on site, but is referenced as the architect of the course.  [Longview (TX) Daily News, May 12, 1939]  Editorial Note:  While the course is not named, we assume it is Mt. Pleasant Country Club where, according to their website, Maxwell designed the original nine holes in 1939.  [http://www.countryclubmtpleasant.com/about-us.html]

May 17                  Maxwell is “on the job at Twin Hills, reconditioning the course with full steam ahead.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, May 17, 1939]

 

June 6                    Maxwell “spent the week at Ekwanok with the purpose of revamping some of the outmoded greens and making them blend into the landscape.”  [New York Sun, June 6, 1939]

 

June 22                  Maxwell is in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.  [Daily Ardmoreite, June 22, 1939]  Editorial Note:  Maxwell was presumably working on the Old Town and, possibly, Reynolds Park courses.

 

June 28                  Brook Hollow authorizes engaging Maxwell to consult on feasibility of converting to bent grass greens. [Club Minutes]

Summer                 Clifford Roberts asks Maxwell to flatten the tongue on the 9th green at Augusta National a bit. [“The Complete Changes to Augusta National”, by Ron Whitten, Golf Digest, March 16, 2017, https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-complete-changes-to-augusta-national]

July 20                   Most of the greens at Old Town completed and sewed with Bermuda and with Italian rye grass overseed for winter play.  [Winston-Salem (NC) Journal, July 20, 1939]

 

July 23                   Brook Hollow announces plans to convert greens to bent grass “within two years.”  [Dallas Morning News, July 23, 1939]

 

September 24       Maxwell’s redesign of the front nine greens at Brook Hollow is complete with the back nine greens expected to be finished within eight months.  [Dallas Morning News, September 24, 1939]

 

Early October       Construction of Old Town expected to be completed.  [Winston-Salem (NC) Journal, July 20, 1939]

 

November 10       Press Maxwell leaves Ardmore for Wichita, Kansas “where he is associated with his father, Perry Maxwell, in building a golf course.”  [Daily Ardmoreite, November 10, 1939]  Editorial Note:  The Wichita course that the Maxwells worked on is not identified. However, the May 23, 1993 Daily Oklahoman lists “MacDonald Park Muni, (formerly Wichita Country Club)” as a Maxwell redesign.  So it is possible that the course referenced in the above article is for the old Wichita Country Club course.  In that regard, we note that the May 30, 1940 Hutchinson News describes the Wichita Country Club course as “undergoing repairs.”

 

November 11       Old Town opens for play.  [“Charming – is the word for Winston”, by R.E. Lauterbach, GOLF magazine, circa May/June 1940]

 

November 12       The conversion of Brook Hollow’s greens to bent grass is in progress.  [Dallas Morning News, November 12, 1939]

November 26       Twin Hills re-opens as a par 71 “a stroke above the old figures, the No. 13 hole having been raised from a par 4 to a par 5 by setting the tee back.”  [The Daily Oklahoman, November 27, 1939]

CONTINUE TO 1940​